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Historical Arctic Logbooks Provide Insights into Past Diets and Climatic Responses of Cod

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, September 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
37 X users

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Historical Arctic Logbooks Provide Insights into Past Diets and Climatic Responses of Cod
Published in
PLOS ONE, September 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0135418
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bryony L. Townhill, David Maxwell, Georg H. Engelhard, Stephen D. Simpson, John K. Pinnegar

Abstract

Gadus morhua (Atlantic cod) stocks in the Barents Sea are currently at levels not seen since the 1950s. Causes for the population increase last century, and understanding of whether such large numbers will be maintained in the future, are unclear. To explore this, we digitised and interrogated historical cod catch and diet datasets from the Barents Sea. Seventeen years of catch data and 12 years of prey data spanning 1930-1959 cover unexplored spatial and temporal ranges, and importantly capture the end of a previous warm period, when temperatures were similar to those currently being experienced. This study aimed to evaluate cod catch per unit effort and prey frequency in relation to spatial, temporal and environmental variables. There was substantial spatio-temporal heterogeneity in catches through the time series. The highest catches were generally in the 1930s and 1940s, although at some localities more cod were recorded late in the 1950s. Generalized Additive Models showed that environmental, spatial and temporal variables are all valuable descriptors of cod catches, with the highest occurring from 15-45°E longitude and 73-77°N latitude, at bottom temperatures between 2 and 4°C and at depths between 150 and 250 m. Cod diets were highly variable during the study period, with frequent changes in the relative frequencies of different prey species, particularly Mallotus villosus (capelin). Environmental variables were particularly good at describing the importance of capelin and Clupea harengus (herring) in the diet. These new analyses support existing knowledge about how the ecology of the region is controlled by climatic variability. When viewed in combination with more recent data, these historical relationships will be valuable in forecasting the future of Barents Sea fisheries, and in understanding how environments and ecosystems may respond.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 37 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Finland 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 46 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Student > Master 3 6%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 10 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 33%
Environmental Science 12 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 15 31%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2024.
All research outputs
#884,710
of 25,305,422 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#11,640
of 219,560 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,732
of 273,782 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#286
of 5,932 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,305,422 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 219,560 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,782 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,932 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.