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Health-related quality of life and hospital costs following esophageal resection: a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Surgical Oncology, September 2015
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Title
Health-related quality of life and hospital costs following esophageal resection: a prospective cohort study
Published in
World Journal of Surgical Oncology, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12957-015-0678-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. Strik, R. P. ten Broek, M. van der Kolk, H. van Goor, J. J. Bonenkamp

Abstract

The incidence rates for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus are increasing while the prognosis has only improved slightly. There is no apparent benefit in short- and long-term survival after different surgical strategies, but surgery is associated with significant morbidity. The goal of this study is to prospectively assess the quality of life and hospital costs after esophageal resections depending on the development of complications. Prospective data was collected from 47 patients undergoing an esophageal resection for esophageal cancer participating in the prospective LAParotomy or LAParoscopy and Adhesions (LAPAD) study (clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT01236625). A comparison was made between patients who developed major complications and minor or no complications regarding quality of life and hospital costs. Thirteen patients developed major complications while 34 patients developed only minor or no complications. Patients with major complications had a mean hospital cost of $16,369 vs $12,409 for patients without or with minor complications. We found no difference in quality of life between the two groups 6 months after surgery. In our cohort, major complications did not seem to have a detrimental effect on postoperative quality of life 6 months after surgery but they increased costs associated with esophageal resection.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 18%
Student > Postgraduate 4 14%
Student > Master 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Librarian 1 4%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 8 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 11%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 9 32%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2015.
All research outputs
#18,425,370
of 22,826,360 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#1,012
of 2,043 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,525
of 267,016 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#19
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,826,360 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,043 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.