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The role of gender in patient preference for breast surgical care – a comment on equality

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, July 2018
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Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Readers on

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21 Mendeley
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Title
The role of gender in patient preference for breast surgical care – a comment on equality
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13584-018-0231-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tulin D. Cil, Alexandra M. Easson

Abstract

Gender preference among patients seeking medical care is an issue that is not well understood. It warrants exploration, particularly for patients undergoing sensitive physical exams. In a recent IJHPR article, Groutz et al. reported a survey study that explored patient preferences in selecting a breast surgeon. They found that a third of patients preferred a female surgeon for their breast examination. However, surgical ability was the primary factor in selecting a surgeon for their breast surgery. This commentary discusses these findings in the context of patient-centered care and issues of gender equality in medical education.Gender equality is considered an important societal movement in achieving human rights for everyone based on their ability, rather than their gender and opportunity. This commentary argues that the goal of gender equality is why women should be encouraged to enter surgical professions, recognizing that patient preferences will be shaped by societal norms. Gender preferences for the performance of sensitive physical examinations by some patients are likely multifactorial and they warrant more exploration to deliver ideal patient centered care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 33%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 4 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 48%
Arts and Humanities 2 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 3 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2018.
All research outputs
#8,398,338
of 13,945,776 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#146
of 382 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,034
of 272,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,945,776 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 382 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,395 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them