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Evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms of pvmdr1 and microsatellite genotype in Plasmodium vivax isolates from Republic of Korea military personnel

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2015
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms of pvmdr1 and microsatellite genotype in Plasmodium vivax isolates from Republic of Korea military personnel
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0845-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dong-Il Chung, Sookwan Jeong, Sylvatrie-Danne Dinzouna-Boutamba, Hye-Won Yang, Sang-Geon Yeo, Yeonchul Hong, Youn-Kyoung Goo

Abstract

Chloroquine has been administered to the soldiers of the Republic of Korea as prophylaxis against vivax malaria. Recent increase in the number of chloroquine-resistant parasites has raised concern over the chemoprophylaxis and treatment of vivax malaria. To monitor the development of chloroquine-resistant parasites in the Republic of Korea, analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of pvmdr1 and microsatellite markers were performed using samples collected from 55 South Korean soldiers infected with Plasmodium vivax. Four SNPs, F1076L, T529, E1233, and S1358, were identified. Among these, S1358 was detected for the first time in Korea. The microsatellite-based study revealed higher genetic diversity in samples collected in 2012 than in 2011. Taken together, the results indicate that P. vivax with a newly identified SNP of pvmdr1 has been introduced into the Korean P. vivax population. Therefore, continuous monitoring for chloroquine-resistant parasites is required for controlling vivax malaria in the Republic of Korea.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 6%
Unknown 15 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 19%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Other 1 6%
Professor 1 6%
Other 4 25%
Unknown 3 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 31%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 25%
Unknown 3 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,974,897
of 6,310,269 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,455
of 2,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,420
of 194,761 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#98
of 133 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,310,269 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,233 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,761 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 133 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.