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Taxonomy of reproductive Nereididae (Annelida) in multispecies swarms at Ambon Island, Indonesia

Overview of attention for article published in ZooKeys, August 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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10 Mendeley
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Title
Taxonomy of reproductive Nereididae (Annelida) in multispecies swarms at Ambon Island, Indonesia
Published in
ZooKeys, August 2015
DOI 10.3897/zookeys.520.9581
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joko Pamungkas, Joko Pamungkas, Christopher J. Glasby

Abstract

Multispecies, or mass, spawning of different invertebrate species is well known for coral reef systems; however, incidences involving polychaetes are poorly documented. In this study we report on mass swarming, prior to spawning, of Nereididae at Ambon Island, Maluku, on three occasions: in 1866, inferred from an historical sample deposited in Naturalis, Leiden, and in March, 2009 and 2014, based on newly collected samples. The 2009 and 2014 events co-occurred with spawning of other polychaetes, known locally as wawo and including the widespread Indo-Pacific eunicid, Palola viridis (Gray in Stair). Ten species of reproductive Nereididae are described, including Composetia marmorata (Horst) new combination, formerly Ceratonereis marmorata; epitokous modifications are described for both sexes of each species including taxonomically important features such as body colour and number of pre-natatory chaetigers. Three distinct types of natatory region morphologies are recognized, which appear to characterise groups of genera. The ten new records brings to 13 the total number of nereidid species known to undergo mass swarming at Ambon Island; a key to the 13 species is provided. Species composition varies slightly between the three time periods: four species were common between all three periods, five species were in common between 1866 and 2014, and four species were in common between 1995 and 2009/14. Two species of Neanthes and one of Nereis are identified as potentially new and will be described in subsequent papers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 40%
Student > Bachelor 2 20%
Other 2 20%
Professor 1 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 70%
Unspecified 1 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 10%
Social Sciences 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2015.
All research outputs
#4,994,899
of 10,467,610 outputs
Outputs from ZooKeys
#1,914
of 2,938 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,583
of 237,299 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ZooKeys
#81
of 117 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,467,610 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,938 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.0. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,299 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 117 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.