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Suburbanization, estrogen contamination, and sex ratio in wild amphibian populations

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
23 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
40 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
109 Mendeley
Title
Suburbanization, estrogen contamination, and sex ratio in wild amphibian populations
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1501065112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Max R. Lambert, Geoffrey S. J. Giller, Larry B. Barber, Kevin C. Fitzgerald, David K. Skelly

Abstract

Research on endocrine disruption in frog populations, such as shifts in sex ratios and feminization of males, has predominantly focused on agricultural pesticides. Recent evidence suggests that suburban landscapes harbor amphibian populations exhibiting similar levels of endocrine disruption; however the endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) sources are unknown. Here, we show that sex ratios of metamorphosing frogs become increasingly female-dominated along a suburbanization gradient. We further show that suburban ponds are frequently contaminated by the classical estrogen estrone and a variety of EDCs produced by plants (phytoestrogens), and that the diversity of organic EDCs is correlated with the extent of developed land use and cultivated lawn and gardens around a pond. Our work also raises the possibility that trace-element contamination associated with human land use around suburban ponds may be contributing to the estrogenic load within suburban freshwaters and constitutes another source of estrogenic exposure for wildlife. These data suggest novel, unexplored pathways of EDC contamination in human-altered environments. In particular, we propose that vegetation changes associated with suburban neighborhoods (e.g., from forests to lawns and ornamental plants) increase the distribution of phytoestrogens in surface waters. The result of frog sex ratios varying as a function of human land use implicates a role for environmental modulation of sexual differentiation in amphibians, which are assumed to only have genetic sex determination. Overall, we show that endocrine disruption is widespread in suburban frog populations and that the causes are likely diverse.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 40 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 2 2%
Portugal 2 2%
United States 2 2%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 102 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 21%
Researcher 21 19%
Student > Master 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 14 13%
Professor 10 9%
Other 17 16%
Unknown 9 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 46 42%
Environmental Science 26 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 2%
Psychology 2 2%
Other 7 6%
Unknown 17 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 235. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2019.
All research outputs
#59,076
of 14,190,373 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#1,477
of 82,021 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,269
of 240,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#33
of 888 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,190,373 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 82,021 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,807 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 888 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.