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Sporadic Parkinson’s disease derived neuronal cells show disease-specific mRNA and small RNA signatures with abundant deregulation of piRNAs

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica Communications, July 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Sporadic Parkinson’s disease derived neuronal cells show disease-specific mRNA and small RNA signatures with abundant deregulation of piRNAs
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica Communications, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40478-018-0561-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Markus Schulze, Annika Sommer, Sonja Plötz, Michaela Farrell, Beate Winner, Janina Grosch, Jürgen Winkler, Markus J. Riemenschneider

Abstract

Differentiated neurons established via iPSCs from patients that suffer from familial Parkinson's disease (PD) have allowed insights into the mechanisms of neurodegeneration. In the larger cohort of patients with sporadic PD, iPSC based information on disease specific cellular phenotypes is rare. We asked whether differences may be present on genomic and epigenomic levels and performed a comprehensive transcriptomic and epigenomic analysis of fibroblasts, iPSCs and differentiated neuronal cells of sporadic PD-patients and controls. We found that on mRNA level, although fibroblasts and iPSCs are largely indistinguishable, differentiated neuronal cells of sporadic PD patients show significant alterations enriched in pathways known to be involved in disease aetiology, like the CREB-pathway and the pathway regulating PGC1α. Moreover, miRNAs and piRNAs/piRNA-like molecules are largely differentially regulated in cells and post-mortem tissue samples between control- and PD-patients. The most striking differences can be found in piRNAs/piRNA-like molecules, with SINE- and LINE-derived piRNAs highly downregulated in a disease specific manner. We conclude that neuronal cells derived from sporadic PD-patients help to elucidate novel disease mechanisms and provide relevant insight into the epigenetic landscape of sporadic Parkinson's disease as particularly regulated by small RNAs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 24%
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 12 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 26%
Neuroscience 9 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2019.
All research outputs
#8,119,763
of 15,184,339 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#551
of 854 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,460
of 274,462 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,184,339 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 854 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,462 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them