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Climate change and physical disturbance cause similar community shifts in biological soil crusts

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
18 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
114 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
204 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Climate change and physical disturbance cause similar community shifts in biological soil crusts
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1509150112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Scott Ferrenberg, Sasha C. Reed, Jayne Belnap

Abstract

Biological soil crusts (biocrusts)-communities of mosses, lichens, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophs living at the soil surface-are fundamental components of drylands worldwide, and destruction of biocrusts dramatically alters biogeochemical processes, hydrology, surface energy balance, and vegetation cover. Although there has been long-standing concern over impacts of physical disturbances on biocrusts (e.g., trampling by livestock, damage from vehicles), there is increasing concern over the potential for climate change to alter biocrust community structure. Using long-term data from the Colorado Plateau, we examined the effects of 10 y of experimental warming and altered precipitation (in full-factorial design) on biocrust communities and compared the effects of altered climate with those of long-term physical disturbance (>10 y of replicated human trampling). Surprisingly, altered climate and physical disturbance treatments had similar effects on biocrust community structure. Warming, altered precipitation frequency [an increase of small (1.2 mm) summer rainfall events], and physical disturbance from trampling all promoted early successional community states marked by dramatic declines in moss cover and increases in cyanobacteria cover, with more variable effects on lichens. Although the pace of community change varied significantly among treatments, our results suggest that multiple aspects of climate change will affect biocrusts to the same degree as physical disturbance. This is particularly disconcerting in the context of warming, as temperatures for drylands are projected to increase beyond those imposed as treatments in our study.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 204 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Poland 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 197 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 46 23%
Researcher 34 17%
Student > Master 34 17%
Student > Bachelor 20 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 6%
Other 31 15%
Unknown 26 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 75 37%
Environmental Science 60 29%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 2%
Other 15 7%
Unknown 30 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 45. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2018.
All research outputs
#504,676
of 15,943,337 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#9,704
of 86,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,304
of 243,584 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#214
of 876 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,943,337 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 86,256 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,584 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 876 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.