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Suicide in Brazilian indigenous communities: clustering of cases in children and adolescents by household

Overview of attention for article published in Revista de Saúde Pública, May 2018
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Title
Suicide in Brazilian indigenous communities: clustering of cases in children and adolescents by household
Published in
Revista de Saúde Pública, May 2018
DOI 10.11606/s1518-8787.2018052000541
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Adriano Lazzarini, Crhistinne Cavalheiro Maymone Gonçalves, Walter Martins Benites, Liliane Ferreira da Silva, Daniel Henrique Tsuha, Albert Icksang Ko, Robert Rohrbaugh, Jason Randolph Andrews, Julio Croda

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To estimate age and sex-specific suicide rates, compare suicide rates between indigenous communities, and quantify the frequency of intrafamilial suicide clustering. METHODS We performed a retrospective cohort study involving 14,666 indigenous individuals in reservations in Dourados, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, from 2003 through 2013 using national and local census. RESULTS The overall suicide rate was 73.4 per 100,000 person-years. Adolescent males aged 15-19 and girls aged 10-14 had the highest rates for each sex at 289.3 (95%CI 187.5-391.2) and 85.3 (95%CI 34.9-135.7), respectively. Comparing the largest reservations, Bororo had a higher suicide rate than Jaguapiru (RR = 4.83, 95%CI 2.85-8.16) and had significantly lower socioeconomic indicators including income and access to electricity. Nine of 19 suicides among children under 15 occurred in household clusters. Compared with adult suicides, a greater proportion of child (OR = 5.12, 95%CI 1.89-13.86, p = 0.001) and adolescent (OR = 3.48, 95%CI 1.29-9.44, p = 0.017) suicides occurred within household clusters. CONCLUSIONS High rates of suicide occur among children and adolescents in these indigenous reservations, particularly in poor communities. Nearly half of child suicides occur within household clusters. These findings underscore the need for broad public health interventions and focused mental health interventions in households following a suicide.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 88 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 18%
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Researcher 9 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 29 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 14%
Social Sciences 10 11%
Psychology 9 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 35 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2018.
All research outputs
#19,203,675
of 21,578,868 outputs
Outputs from Revista de Saúde Pública
#626
of 626 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#257,664
of 295,760 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista de Saúde Pública
#3
of 3 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 626 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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