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Gait in normal pressure hydrocephalus: characteristics and effects of the CSF tap test

Overview of attention for article published in Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria, May 2018
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Title
Gait in normal pressure hydrocephalus: characteristics and effects of the CSF tap test
Published in
Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria, May 2018
DOI 10.1590/0004-282x20180037
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ricardo Krause Martinez de Souza, Samanta Fabrício Blattes da Rocha, Rodrigo Tomazini Martins, Pedro André Kowacs, Ricardo Ramina

Abstract

Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), described by Hakim and Adams in 1965, is characterized by gait apraxia, urinary incontinence, and dementia. It is associated with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and ventricular dilation that cannot be attributed to cerebral atrophy. To evaluate gait characteristics in patients with idiopathic NPH and investigate the effect of the CSF tap test (CSF-TT) on gait. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with probable idiopathic NPH were submitted to the CSF-TT. The procedure aimed to achieve changes in gait parameters. Fifteen gait parameters were assessed before and after the CSF-TT. Five showed a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.05): walking speed (p < 0.001), cadence (p < 0.001), step length (p < 0.001), en bloc turning (p = 0.001), and step height (p = 0.004). This study demonstrated that gait speed was the most responsive parameter to the CSF-TT, followed by cadence, step length, en bloc turning, and step height.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 7 13%
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Researcher 4 7%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 14 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 24%
Neuroscience 10 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Sports and Recreations 3 6%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 18 33%