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Is domestication driven by reduced fear of humans? Boldness, metabolism and serotonin levels in divergently selected red junglefowl (Gallus gallus)

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Letters, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
21 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
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Title
Is domestication driven by reduced fear of humans? Boldness, metabolism and serotonin levels in divergently selected red junglefowl (Gallus gallus)
Published in
Biology Letters, September 2015
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2015.0509
Pubmed ID
Authors

Beatrix Agnvall, Rebecca Katajamaa, Jordi Altimiras, Per Jensen

Abstract

Domesticated animals tend to develop a coherent set of phenotypic traits. Tameness could be a central underlying factor driving this, and we therefore selected red junglefowl, ancestors of all domestic chickens, for high or low fear of humans during six generations. We measured basal metabolic rate (BMR), feed efficiency, boldness in a novel object (NO) test, corticosterone reactivity and basal serotonin levels (related to fearfulness) in birds from the fifth and sixth generation of the high- and low-fear lines, respectively (44-48 individuals). Corticosterone response to physical restraint did not differ between selection lines. However, BMR was higher in low-fear birds, as was feed efficiency. Low-fear males had higher plasma levels of serotonin and both low-fear males and females were bolder in an NO test. The results show that many aspects of the domesticated phenotype may have developed as correlated responses to reduced fear of humans, an essential trait for successful domestication.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 10%
Germany 1 5%
Bulgaria 1 5%
France 1 5%
United Kingdom 1 5%
Japan 1 5%
Hungary 1 5%
Unknown 12 60%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 25%
Researcher 4 20%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Other 5 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 75%
Unspecified 2 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 101. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2017.
All research outputs
#90,936
of 8,619,833 outputs
Outputs from Biology Letters
#164
of 2,040 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,848
of 221,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Letters
#8
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,619,833 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,040 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,354 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.