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Age-driven modulation of tRNA-derived fragments in Drosophila and their potential targets

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Direct, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
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Title
Age-driven modulation of tRNA-derived fragments in Drosophila and their potential targets
Published in
Biology Direct, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13062-015-0081-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Spyros Karaiskos, Ammar S. Naqvi, Karl E. Swanson, Andrey Grigoriev

Abstract

Development of sequencing technologies and supporting computation enable discovery of small RNA molecules that previously escaped detection or were ignored due to low count numbers. While the focus in the analysis of small RNA libraries has been primarily on microRNAs (miRNAs), recent studies have reported findings of fragments of transfer RNAs (tRFs) across a range of organisms. Here we describe Drosophila melanogaster tRFs, which appear to have a number of structural and functional features similar to those of miRNAs but are less abundant. As is the case with miRNAs, (i) tRFs seem to have distinct isoforms preferentially originating from 5' or 3' end of a precursor molecule (in this case, tRNA), (ii) ends of tRFs appear to contain short "seed" sequences matching conserved regions across 12 Drosophila genomes, preferentially in 3' UTRs but also in introns and exons; (iii) tRFs display specific isoform loading into Ago1 and Ago2 and thus likely function in RISC complexes; (iii) levels of loading in Ago1 and Ago2 differ considerably; and (iv) both tRF expression and loading appear to be age-dependent, indicating potential regulatory changes from young to adult organisms. We found that Drosophila tRF reads mapped to both nuclear and mitochondrial tRNA genes for all 20 amino acids, while previous studies have usually reported fragments from only a few tRNAs. These tRFs show a number of similarities with miRNAs, including seed sequences. Based on complementarity with conserved Drosophila regions we identified such seed sequences and their possible targets with matches in the 3'UTR regions. Strikingly, the potential target genes of the most abundant tRFs show significant Gene Ontology enrichment in development and neuronal function. The latter suggests that involvement of tRFs in the RNA interfering pathway may play a role in brain activity or brain changes with age. This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin, Neil Smalheiser and Alexander Kel.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
China 1 2%
Unknown 64 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 33%
Researcher 14 21%
Student > Master 11 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Student > Bachelor 3 5%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 8 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 29 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 36%
Computer Science 1 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Neuroscience 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 9 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2016.
All research outputs
#1,186,357
of 7,588,328 outputs
Outputs from Biology Direct
#125
of 526 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,491
of 231,777 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Direct
#9
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,588,328 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 526 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,777 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.