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Genome characterisation of two Ljungan virus isolates from wild bank voles ( Myodes glareolus ) in Sweden

Overview of attention for article published in Infection, Genetics & Evolution, December 2015
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Title
Genome characterisation of two Ljungan virus isolates from wild bank voles ( Myodes glareolus ) in Sweden
Published in
Infection, Genetics & Evolution, December 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.meegid.2015.09.010
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kieran C. Pounder, Phillip C. Watts, Bo Niklasson, Eva R.K. Kallio, Denise A. Marston, Anthony R. Fooks, Michael Begon, Lorraine M. McElhinney

Abstract

Ljungan virus (LV) (family Picornaviridae, genus Parechovirus) is a suspected zoonotic pathogen with associations to human disease in Sweden. LV is a single-stranded RNA virus with a positive sense genome. There are five published Ljungan virus strains, three isolated from Sweden and two from America, and are classified into four genotypes. A further two strains described here were isolated from wild bank voles (Myodes glareolus) caught in Västmanlands county, Sweden in 1994. These strains were sequenced using next generation pyrosequencing technology on the GS454flx platform. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of the obtained genomes confirms isolates LV340 and LV342 as two new putative members of genotype 2 along with LV145SL, with 92 % and 99 % nucleotide identities respectively. Only two codon sites throughout the entire genome were identified as undergoing positive selection, both situated within the VP3 structural region, in or near to major antigenic sites. Whilst these two strains do not constitute new genotypes they provide evidence, though weakly supported, which suggests the evolution of Ljungan viruses to be relatively slow, a characteristic unlike other picornaviruses. Additional genomic sequences are urgently required for Ljungan virus strains, particularly from different locations or hosts, to fully understand the evolutionary and epidemiological properties of this potentially zoonotic virus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 40%
Researcher 2 20%
Student > Master 1 10%
Student > Postgraduate 1 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 10%
Other 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 60%
Unspecified 1 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 10%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2015.
All research outputs
#10,061,279
of 12,577,568 outputs
Outputs from Infection, Genetics & Evolution
#1,132
of 1,908 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,246
of 243,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infection, Genetics & Evolution
#12
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,577,568 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,908 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.