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Detection of chromosome segments of zebu and taurine origin and their effect on beef production and growth

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Science, February 2011
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Title
Detection of chromosome segments of zebu and taurine origin and their effect on beef production and growth
Published in
Journal of Animal Science, February 2011
DOI 10.2527/jas.2010-3363
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Bolormaa, B. J. Hayes, R. J. Hawken, Y. Zhang, A. Reverter, M. E. Goddard

Abstract

Cattle in breeds formed by recent crossing of Bos taurus (Bt) and Bos indicus (Bi) subspecies should contain chromosomes that are a composite of Bt and Bt segments. Using data from a 50K SNP chip, we were able to identify whether a chromosome segment of 11 SNP in a composite animal descended from a Bt or a Bi ancestor. When the method was tested in purebred Bt or Brahman cattle, about 94% of segments were assigned correctly. About 10% of the genome in Australian Brahman cattle appears to be of Bt origin, as might be expected from their history. We then examined the effect of the origin of each chromosome segment on BW in a population of 515 Bt × Bi composite cattle and found 67 chromosome segments with a significant (P<0.01) effect. We confirmed these effects by examining these 67 segments in a population of Brahman cattle and in a population of mixed breeds including composite breeds such as Santa Gertrudis and Brahman cattle. About 66% of the 67 segments had an effect in the same direction in the confirmation analyses as in the discovery population. However, the effect on BW and other traits of chromosome segment origin is small, indicating that we had low power to detect these effects with the number of animals available. Consequently, when chromosome segment origin was used in genomic selection to predict BW, the accuracy was low (0.08). Chromosome segments that had a positive effect on BW tend to be at greater frequency in composite breeds than chromosome segments with a negative effect on BW.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 2 5%
Finland 1 2%
Poland 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Argentina 1 2%
Uganda 1 2%
Unknown 35 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 50%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 19%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Professor 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 35 83%
Unspecified 3 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Materials Science 1 2%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2011.
All research outputs
#3,107,935
of 4,506,214 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Science
#457
of 805 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,403
of 73,645 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Science
#4
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,506,214 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 805 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 73,645 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.