↓ Skip to main content

The epigenetic clock and pubertal, neuroendocrine, psychiatric, and cognitive outcomes in adolescents

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, July 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The epigenetic clock and pubertal, neuroendocrine, psychiatric, and cognitive outcomes in adolescents
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13148-018-0528-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Suarez, Jari Lahti, Darina Czamara, Marius Lahti-Pulkkinen, Polina Girchenko, Sture Andersson, Timo E. Strandberg, Rebecca M. Reynolds, Eero Kajantie, Elisabeth B. Binder, Katri Raikkonen

Abstract

Molecular aging biomarkers, such as epigenetic age predictors, predict risk factors of premature aging, and morbidity/mortality more accurately than chronological age in middle-aged and elderly populations. Yet, it remains elusive if such biomarkers are associated with aging-related outcomes earlier in life when individuals begin to diverge in aging trajectories. We tested if the Horvath epigenetic age predictor is associated with pubertal, neuroendocrine, psychiatric, and cognitive aging-related outcomes in a sample of 239 adolescents, 11.0-13.2 years-old. Each year increase in epigenetic age acceleration (AA) was associated with 0.06 SD units higher weight-for-age, 0.08 SD units taller height-for-age, -0.09 SD units less missed from the expected adult height, 13 and 16% higher odds, respectively, for each stage increase in breast/genitals development on the Tanner Staging Questionnaire and pubertal stage on the Pubertal Development Scale, 4.2% higher salivary cortisol upon awakening, and 18 to 34% higher odds for internalizing and thought problems on the Child Behavior Checklist (p values <  0.045). AA was not significantly associated with cognition. Our findings suggest that already in adolescence, AA is associated with physiological age acceleration, which may index risk of earlier aging. AA may identify individuals for preventive interventions decades before aging-related diseases become manifest.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 22%
Student > Master 4 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Other 7 22%
Unknown 5 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 22%
Psychology 4 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Neuroscience 3 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 7 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2018.
All research outputs
#8,227,254
of 13,801,769 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#464
of 688 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,575
of 271,566 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,801,769 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 688 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,566 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them