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Disaggregating polyploidy, parental genome dosage and hybridity contributions to heterosis in Arabidopsis thaliana

Overview of attention for article published in New Phytologist, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
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Title
Disaggregating polyploidy, parental genome dosage and hybridity contributions to heterosis in Arabidopsis thaliana
Published in
New Phytologist, September 2015
DOI 10.1111/nph.13650
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antoine Fort, Peter Ryder, Peter C. McKeown, Cris Wijnen, Mark G. Aarts, Ronan Sulpice, Charles Spillane

Abstract

Heterosis is the phenomenon whereby hybrid offspring of genetically divergent parents display superior characteristics compared with their parents. Although hybridity and polyploidy can influence heterosis in hybrid plants, the differential contributions of hybridity vs polyploidy to heterosis effects remain unknown. To address this question, we investigated heterosis effects on rosette size and growth rate of 88 distinct F1 lines of Arabidopsis thaliana consisting of diploids, reciprocal triploids and tetraploids in isogenic and hybrid genetic contexts. 'Heterosis without hybridity' effects on plant size can be generated in genetically isogenic F1 triploid plants. Paternal genome excess F1 triploids display positive heterosis, whereas maternal genome excess F1 s display negative heterosis effects. Paternal genome dosage increases plant size in F1 hybrid triploid plants by, on average, 57% (in contrast with 35% increase displayed by F1 diploid hybrids). Such effects probably derive from differential seed size, as the growth rate of triploids was similar to diploids. Tetraploid plants display a lower growth rate compared with other ploidies, whereas hybrids display increased early stage growth rate. By disaggregating heterosis effects caused by hybridity vs genome dosage, we advance our understanding of heterosis in plants and facilitate novel paternal genome dosage-based strategies to enhance heterosis effects in crop plants.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Chile 1 1%
Unknown 67 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 40%
Researcher 11 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Professor 5 7%
Student > Master 4 6%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 59%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 21%
Environmental Science 1 1%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 1%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 8 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2016.
All research outputs
#1,193,759
of 15,992,402 outputs
Outputs from New Phytologist
#1,192
of 6,538 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,197
of 251,126 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New Phytologist
#21
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,992,402 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,538 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,126 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.