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Orbital infantile haemangioma: radiological features and treatment – case series and literature review

Overview of attention for article published in Orbit, July 2018
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Title
Orbital infantile haemangioma: radiological features and treatment – case series and literature review
Published in
Orbit, July 2018
DOI 10.1080/01676830.2018.1501397
Pubmed ID
Authors

Giorgio Albanese, Padma Mohandas, Louise Wells, Jane Ravenscroft, Jothsana Srinivasan, Shery Thomas, Timothy Taylor, Katya Tambe

Abstract

The aim of this study is to report a retrospective case series on orbital infantile haemangiomas (OIH). Radiological features and treatment with oral propranolol (OP) are illustrated along with an updated literature review. A retrospective chart review of six children, diagnosed with OIH from November 2015 to October 2016, was carried out. Only children with deep documented orbital involvement were included. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) under general anaesthesia. OP was administered to the infants according to the Nottingham Children's Hospital guideline. As per the guideline, a preliminary paediatric assessment was performed and a 1 mg/kg test dose was administered, followed by definitive treatment at a dosage of 2 mg/kg in three divided doses. Average age at presentation was within the first 3 weeks of life. T1 hypointensity, T2 hyperintensity, avid enhancement with contrast, and the presence of flow-voids appear a fixed pattern of OIH on MRI. Response to treatment was noticed within 4 weeks in all children, and two of them (33.3%) responded within the first 7 days. In two children (33.3%), the haemangioma became clinically undetectable by the seventh month of treatment, while the other four (66.6%) experienced an almost complete regression of the OIH by the last follow-up. No complications were found. Our series strengthens the understanding that MRI is the preferred imaging modality in the investigation of OIH, showing vascular features, detailed orbital extension, and possible associated malformations. OP is the treatment of choice for OIH, and our study confirms its safety and effectiveness.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 4 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Student > Postgraduate 2 18%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Student > Master 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 73%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Unknown 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2019.
All research outputs
#13,359,665
of 15,132,677 outputs
Outputs from Orbit
#169
of 391 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#237,239
of 276,718 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orbit
#8
of 35 outputs
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