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Prenatal and childhood exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and measures of attention, impulse control, and visual spatial abilities

Overview of attention for article published in Environment International, October 2018
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Title
Prenatal and childhood exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and measures of attention, impulse control, and visual spatial abilities
Published in
Environment International, October 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2018.07.013
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ann M. Vuong, Joseph M. Braun, Kimberly Yolton, Zhiyang Wang, Changchun Xie, Glenys M. Webster, Xiaoyun Ye, Antonia M. Calafat, Kim N. Dietrich, Bruce P. Lanphear, Aimin Chen

Abstract

Despite evidence from toxicological studies describing the potential neurotoxicity of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), their role in neurodevelopment remains uncertain amid inconsistent findings from epidemiological studies. Using data from 218 mother-child dyads from the Health Outcomes and Measures of the Environment Study, we examined prenatal and childhood (3 and 8 years) serum concentrations of four PFAS and inattention, impulsivity, and visual spatial abilities. At 8 years, we used the Conners' Continuous Performance Test-II to assess attention and impulse control and the Virtual Morris Water Maze (VMWM) to measure visual spatial abilities. In multiple informant models, there was no evidence to indicate that prenatal or childhood PFAS are associated with attention. However, there was an inverse association between prenatal ln-perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and errors of commission (β = -2.0, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] -3.8, -0.3). Ln-perfluorononanoate (PFNA) at 3 years was associated with longer (poorer) VMWM completion times of 3.6 seconds (CI 1.6, 5.6). However, higher concurrent concentrations of ln-perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) (β = -2.4 s, 95% CI -4.4, -0.3) were associated with shorter (better) times. Higher prenatal PFHxS was positively associated with percentage of traveling distance in the correct quadrant (β = 4.2%, 95% CI 0.8, 7.7), indicating better performance. Findings were mixed for prenatal and childhood PFAS concentrations and visual spatial abilities. There is not enough evidence to support that PFAS are associated with visual spatial abilities as assessed by the VMWM or CPT-II measures of inattention or impulsivity in children at age 8 years.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 9 30%
Researcher 9 30%
Other 2 7%
Student > Master 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 14 47%
Environmental Science 3 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Neuroscience 2 7%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Other 7 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 July 2018.
All research outputs
#11,789,279
of 13,285,014 outputs
Outputs from Environment International
#2,157
of 2,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,341
of 268,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environment International
#71
of 79 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,285,014 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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