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Sexual dimorphism in the aged rat CD4+ T lymphocyte-mediated immune response elicited by inoculation with spinal cord homogenate

Overview of attention for article published in Mechanisms of Ageing & Development, December 2015
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Title
Sexual dimorphism in the aged rat CD4+ T lymphocyte-mediated immune response elicited by inoculation with spinal cord homogenate
Published in
Mechanisms of Ageing & Development, December 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.mad.2015.09.004
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mirjana Nacka-Aleksić, Ivan Pilipović, Zorica Stojić-Vukanić, Duško Kosec, Biljana Bufan, Ivana Vujnović, Nevena Arsenović-Ranin, Mirjana Dimitrijević, Gordana Leposavić

Abstract

Considering the crucial pathogenic role of CD4+ T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and the opposite direction of the sexual dimorphism in the severity of the disease in 22-24- and 3-month-old Dark Agouti rats, sex differences in CD4+ T-cell-mediated immune response in aged rats immunized for EAE were examined and compared with those in young animals. In the inductive phase of EAE, fewer activated CD4+ lymphocytes were retrieved from draining lymph nodes of male (developing less severe disease) compared with female rats, due, at least partly, to their lesser expansion. The former reflected a greater suppressive capacity of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells. Consequently, CD4+ lymphocyte infiltration into the spinal cord of aged male rats was diminished. At the peak of EAE, the frequency of reactivated cells was lower, whereas that of the regulatory CD4+ cells was higher in male rat spinal cord. Consistently, microglial activation and the expression of proinflammatory/damaging cytokines in male rat spinal cord mononuclear cells were diminished. Additionally, the frequency of the highly pathogenic IFN-γ+IL-17+T lymphocytes infiltrating their spinal cord was lower. Together, these results point to (i) an age-specificity in CD4+ cell-mediated immune response and (ii) mechanisms underlying the sex differences in this response in aged rats.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 31%
Student > Master 3 23%
Researcher 3 23%
Other 1 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Psychology 1 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Unknown 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2016.
All research outputs
#10,890,597
of 12,288,537 outputs
Outputs from Mechanisms of Ageing & Development
#814
of 879 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#205,959
of 250,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Mechanisms of Ageing & Development
#11
of 13 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.