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Positive cofactor 4 (PC4) contributes to the regulation of replication-dependent canonical histone gene expression

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Molecular Biology, July 2018
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Title
Positive cofactor 4 (PC4) contributes to the regulation of replication-dependent canonical histone gene expression
Published in
BMC Molecular Biology, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12867-018-0110-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aleksandra Brzek, Marlena Cichocka, Jakub Dolata, Wojciech Juzwa, Daniel Schümperli, Katarzyna Dorota Raczynska

Abstract

Core canonical histones are required in the S phase of the cell cycle to pack newly synthetized DNA, therefore the expression of their genes is highly activated during DNA replication. In mammalian cells, this increment is achieved by both enhanced transcription and 3' end processing. In this paper, we described positive cofactor 4 (PC4) as a protein that contributes to the regulation of replication-dependent histone gene expression. We showed that PC4 influences RNA polymerase II recruitment to histone gene loci in a cell cycle-dependent manner. The most important effect was observed in S phase where PC4 knockdown leads to the elevated level of RNA polymerase II on histone genes, which corresponds to the increased total level of those gene transcripts. The opposite effect was caused by PC4 overexpression. Moreover, we found that PC4 has a negative effect on the unique 3' end processing of histone pre-mRNAs that can be based on the interaction of PC4 with U7 snRNP and CstF64. Interestingly, this effect does not depend on the cell cycle. We conclude that PC4 might repress RNA polymerase II recruitment and transcription of replication-dependent histone genes in order to maintain the very delicate balance between histone gene expression and DNA synthesis. It guards the cell from excess of histones in S phase. Moreover, PC4 might promote the interaction of cleavage and polyadenylation complex with histone pre-mRNAs, that might impede with the recruitment of histone cleavage complex. This in turn decreases the 3' end processing efficiency of histone gene transcripts.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 43%
Researcher 1 14%
Student > Master 1 14%
Unknown 2 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 29%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 14%
Unknown 2 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2018.
All research outputs
#11,799,274
of 13,297,120 outputs
Outputs from BMC Molecular Biology
#218
of 264 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,239
of 268,280 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Molecular Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
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