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Oral administration of chestnut tannins to reduce the duration of neonatal calf diarrhea

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, July 2018
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Title
Oral administration of chestnut tannins to reduce the duration of neonatal calf diarrhea
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12917-018-1549-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

F. Bonelli, L. Turini, G. Sarri, A. Serra, A. Buccioni, M. Mele

Abstract

Neonatal calf diarrhea is generally caused by infectious agents and is a very common disease in bovine practice, leading to substantial economic losses. Tannins are known for their astringent and anti-inflammatory properties in the gastro-enteric tract. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the oral administration of chestnut tannins (Castanea sativa Mill.) in order to reduce the duration of calf neonatal diarrhea. Twenty-four Italian Friesian calves affected by neonatal diarrhea were included. The duration of the diarrheic episode (DDE) was recorded and the animals were divided into a control group (C), which received Effydral® in 2 l of warm water, and a tannin-treated group (T), which received Effydral® in 2 l of warm water plus 10 g of extract of chestnut tannins powder. A Mann-Whitney test was performed to verify differences for the DDE values between the two groups. The DDE was significantly higher in group C than in group T (p = 0.02), resulting in 10.1 ± 3.2 and 6.6 ± 3.8 days, respectively. Phytotherapic treatments for various diseases have become more common both in human and in veterinary medicine, in order to reduce the presence of antibiotic molecules in the food chain and in the environment. Administration of tannins in calves with diarrhea seemed to shorten the DDE in T by almost 4 days compared to C, suggesting an effective astringent action of chestnut tannins in the calf, as already reported in humans. The use of chestnut tannins in calves could represent an effective, low-impact treatment for neonatal diarrhea.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 23%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 7 20%
Unknown 9 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 23%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 9 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2018.
All research outputs
#11,827,557
of 13,331,643 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#1,568
of 1,949 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#231,974
of 268,171 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#19
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,331,643 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,949 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.