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Validation of a Malay Version of the Smartphone Addiction Scale among Medical Students in Malaysia

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
210 Mendeley
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Title
Validation of a Malay Version of the Smartphone Addiction Scale among Medical Students in Malaysia
Published in
PLoS ONE, October 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0139337
Pubmed ID
Authors

Siew Mooi Ching, Anne Yee, Vasudevan Ramachandran, Sazlyna Mohd Sazlly Lim, Wan Aliaa Wan Sulaiman, Yoke Loong Foo, Fan kee Hoo

Abstract

This study was initiated to determine the psychometric properties of the Smart Phone Addiction Scale (SAS) by translating and validating this scale into the Malay language (SAS-M), which is the main language spoken in Malaysia. This study can distinguish smart phone and internet addiction among multi-ethnic Malaysian medical students. In addition, the reliability and validity of the SAS was also demonstrated. A total of 228 participants were selected between August 2014 and September 2014 to complete a set of questionnaires, including the SAS and the modified Kimberly Young Internet addiction test (IAT) in the Malay language. There were 99 males and 129 females with ages ranging from 19 to 22 years old (21.7±1.1) included in this study. Descriptive and factor analyses, intra-class coefficients, t-tests and correlation analyses were conducted to verify the reliability and validity of the SAS. Bartlett's test of sphericity was significant (p <0.01), and the Kaiser-Mayer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy for the SAS-M was 0.92, indicating meritoriously that the factor analysis was appropriate. The internal consistency and concurrent validity of the SAS-M were verified (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94). All of the subscales of the SAS-M, except for positive anticipation, were significantly related to the Malay version of the IAT. This study developed the first smart phone addiction scale among medical students. This scale was shown to be reliable and valid in the Malay language.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 210 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 207 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 53 25%
Student > Master 33 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 13%
Researcher 11 5%
Other 9 4%
Other 43 20%
Unknown 34 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 59 28%
Psychology 32 15%
Social Sciences 20 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 9%
Computer Science 10 5%
Other 31 15%
Unknown 40 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2015.
All research outputs
#8,368,408
of 15,641,217 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#70,499
of 155,904 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,253
of 253,878 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#2,315
of 5,630 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,641,217 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 155,904 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,878 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,630 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.