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Bidirectional relationships between psychological health and dermatological conditions in children

Overview of attention for article published in Psychology Research and Behavior Management, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
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Title
Bidirectional relationships between psychological health and dermatological conditions in children
Published in
Psychology Research and Behavior Management, July 2018
DOI 10.2147/prbm.s117583
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amy E Mitchell

Abstract

Dermatological conditions are common among children. They are a frequent cause of presentation to health care services and a leading contributor to burden of disease. Evidence supports the notion that bidirectional relationships exist between children's physical and psychological health, whereby the child's dermatological condition can impact their psychological health and well-being, while, in the reverse direction, psychological factors (eg, stress) can impact the severity and course of the child's skin disease. The psychological impact of dermatological conditions in childhood needs to be taken into account during the assessment, planning, and treatment phases of management. Likewise, the potential effect of children's emotional and behavioral difficulties on management, particularly in terms of the impact on parents' ability to implement their child's treatment plan, should be considered. This literature review summarizes the current evidence for the relationships between three common chronic dermatological conditions of childhood - atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and urticaria - and psychological adjustment and quality of life in childhood. Overall, a general paucity of research in the pediatric context - combined with limitations in terms of study design, variability in operationalization of constructs, and heterogeneity in measurement of outcomes - makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions in this area. Based on the available research, implications for successful long-term management of these conditions are discussed in terms of integrating psychological and parenting support with medical management to improve adherence, reduce disease severity, and improve quality of life for children and their families.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 23%
Unspecified 2 15%
Researcher 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 15%
Student > Postgraduate 2 15%
Other 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 31%
Psychology 4 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 23%
Unspecified 2 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2018.
All research outputs
#6,754,040
of 12,459,998 outputs
Outputs from Psychology Research and Behavior Management
#106
of 207 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,624
of 270,172 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychology Research and Behavior Management
#5
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,459,998 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 207 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,172 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.