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Characterization of Environmentally Persistent Escherichia coli Isolates Leached from an Irish Soil

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, February 2010
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Title
Characterization of Environmentally Persistent Escherichia coli Isolates Leached from an Irish Soil
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, February 2010
DOI 10.1128/aem.01944-09
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fiona P. Brennan, Florence Abram, Fabio A. Chinalia, Karl G. Richards, Vincent O'Flaherty

Abstract

Soils are typically considered to be suboptimal environments for enteric organisms, but there is increasing evidence that Escherichia coli populations can become resident in soil under favorable conditions. Previous work reported the growth of autochthonous E. coli in a maritime temperate Luvic Stagnosol soil, and this study aimed to characterize, by molecular and physiological means, the genetic diversity and physiology of environmentally persistent E. coli isolates leached from the soil. Molecular analysis (16S rRNA sequencing, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and a multiplex PCR method) established the genetic diversity of the isolates (n = 7), while physiological methods determined the metabolic capability and environmental fitness of the isolates, relative to those of laboratory strains, under the conditions tested. Genotypic analysis indicated that the leached isolates do not form a single genetic grouping but that multiple genotypic groups are capable of surviving and proliferating in this environment. In physiological studies, environmental isolates grew well across a broad range of temperatures and media, in comparison with the growth of laboratory strains. These findings suggest that certain E. coli strains may have the ability to colonize and adapt to soil conditions. The resulting lack of fecal specificity has implications for the use of E. coli as an indicator of fecal pollution in the environment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Ireland 1 1%
Malaysia 1 1%
Nigeria 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Unknown 83 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 19%
Student > Master 16 18%
Student > Bachelor 14 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 6 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 44%
Environmental Science 16 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 6%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 11 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2011.
All research outputs
#11,600,161
of 14,640,838 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#9,854
of 11,173 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#153,207
of 208,090 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#83
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,640,838 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,173 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,090 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.