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Lacerations and Embedded Needles Caused by Epinephrine Autoinjector Use in Children

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Emergency Medicine, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
48 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
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Title
Lacerations and Embedded Needles Caused by Epinephrine Autoinjector Use in Children
Published in
Annals of Emergency Medicine, March 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2015.07.011
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julie C. Brown, Rachel E. Tuuri, Sabreen Akhter, Lilia D. Guerra, Ian S. Goodman, Sage R. Myers, Charles Nozicka, Shannon Manzi, Katharine Long, Troy Turner, Gregory P. Conners, Rachel W. Thompson, Esther Park

Abstract

Epinephrine autoinjector use for anaphylaxis is increasing. There are reports of digit injections because of incorrect autoinjector use, but no previous reports of lacerations, to our knowledge. We report complications of epinephrine autoinjector use in children and discuss features of these devices, and their instructions for use, and how these may contribute to injuries. We queried emergency medicine e-mail discussion lists and social media allergy groups to identify epinephrine autoinjector injuries involving children. Twenty-two cases of epinephrine autoinjector-related injuries are described. Twenty-one occurred during intentional use for the child's allergic reaction. Seventeen children experienced lacerations. In 4 cases, the needle stuck in the child's limb. In 1 case, the device lacerated a nurse's finger. The device associated with the injury was operated by health care providers (6 cases), the patient's parent (12 cases, including 2 nurses), educators (3 cases), and the patient (1 case). Of the 3 epinephrine autoinjectors currently available in North America, none include instructions to immobilize the child's leg. Only 1 has a needle that self-retracts; the others have needles that remain in the thigh during the 10 seconds that the user is instructed to hold the device against the leg. Instructions do not caution against reinjection if the needle is dislodged during these 10 seconds. Epinephrine autoinjectors are lifesaving devices in the management of anaphylaxis. However, some have caused lacerations and other injuries in children. Minimizing needle injection time, improving device design, and providing instructions to immobilize the leg before use may decrease the risk of these injuries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 48 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Ireland 1 2%
Unknown 63 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 16 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 14%
Researcher 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 11%
Engineering 5 8%
Computer Science 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 9 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 147. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2016.
All research outputs
#114,950
of 14,533,643 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Emergency Medicine
#93
of 5,082 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,846
of 253,319 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Emergency Medicine
#4
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,533,643 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,082 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,319 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.