↓ Skip to main content

Metabolic reprogramming: the emerging concept and associated therapeutic strategies

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
157 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
233 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Metabolic reprogramming: the emerging concept and associated therapeutic strategies
Published in
Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13046-015-0221-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Go J. Yoshida

Abstract

Tumor tissue is composed of cancer cells and surrounding stromal cells with diverse genetic/epigenetic backgrounds, a situation known as intra-tumoral heterogeneity. Cancer cells are surrounded by a totally different microenvironment than that of normal cells; consequently, tumor cells must exhibit rapidly adaptive responses to hypoxia and hypo-nutrient conditions. This phenomenon of changes of tumor cellular bioenergetics, called "metabolic reprogramming", has been recognized as one of 10 hallmarks of cancer. Metabolic reprogramming is required for both malignant transformation and tumor development, including invasion and metastasis. Although the Warburg effect has been widely accepted as a common feature of metabolic reprogramming, accumulating evidence has revealed that tumor cells depend on mitochondrial metabolism as well as aerobic glycolysis. Remarkably, cancer-associated fibroblasts in tumor stroma tend to activate both glycolysis and autophagy in contrast to neighboring cancer cells, which leads to a reverse Warburg effect. Heterogeneity of monocarboxylate transporter expression reflects cellular metabolic heterogeneity with respect to the production and uptake of lactate. In tumor tissue, metabolic heterogeneity induces metabolic symbiosis, which is responsible for adaptation to drastic changes in the nutrient microenvironment resulting from chemotherapy. In addition, metabolic heterogeneity is responsible for the failure to induce the same therapeutic effect against cancer cells as a whole. In particular, cancer stem cells exhibit several biological features responsible for resistance to conventional anti-tumor therapies. Consequently, cancer stem cells tend to form minimal residual disease after chemotherapy and exhibit metastatic potential with additional metabolic reprogramming. This type of altered metabolic reprogramming leads to adaptive/acquired resistance to anti-tumor therapy. Collectively, complex and dynamic metabolic reprogramming should be regarded as a reflection of the "robustness" of tumor cells against unfavorable conditions. This review focuses on the concept of metabolic reprogramming in heterogeneous tumor tissue, and further emphasizes the importance of developing novel therapeutic strategies based on drug repositioning.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 233 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Unknown 228 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 47 20%
Researcher 42 18%
Student > Master 40 17%
Student > Bachelor 29 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 6%
Other 37 16%
Unknown 25 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 69 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 66 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 3%
Neuroscience 5 2%
Other 21 9%
Unknown 33 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,298,819
of 6,240,950 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#67
of 372 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,945
of 193,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#4
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,240,950 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 61st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 372 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 193,564 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.