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Niche divergence builds the case for ecological speciation in skinks of the Plestiodon skiltonianus species complex

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, October 2015
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Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Niche divergence builds the case for ecological speciation in skinks of the Plestiodon skiltonianus species complex
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, October 2015
DOI 10.1002/ece3.1610
Pubmed ID
Authors

Guinevere O. U. Wogan, Jonathan Q. Richmond

Abstract

Adaptation to different thermal environments has the potential to cause evolutionary changes that are sufficient to drive ecological speciation. Here, we examine whether climate-based niche divergence in lizards of the Plestiodon skiltonianus species complex is consistent with the outcomes of such a process. Previous work on this group shows that a mechanical sexual barrier has evolved between species that differ mainly in body size and that the barrier may be a by-product of selection for increased body size in lineages that have invaded xeric environments; however, baseline information on niche divergence among members of the group is lacking. We quantified the climatic niche using mechanistic physiological and correlative niche models and then estimated niche differences among species using ordination techniques and tests of niche overlap and equivalency. Our results show that the thermal niches of size-divergent, reproductively isolated morphospecies are significantly differentiated and that precipitation may have been as important as temperature in causing increased shifts in body size in xeric habitats. While these findings alone do not demonstrate thermal adaptation or identify the cause of speciation, their integration with earlier genetic and behavioral studies provides a useful test of phenotype-environment associations that further support the case for ecological speciation in these lizards.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 2 5%
United States 2 5%
Australia 1 2%
Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Unknown 36 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 35%
Researcher 10 23%
Student > Master 7 16%
Other 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 74%
Environmental Science 4 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Engineering 1 2%
Unknown 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2015.
All research outputs
#12,737,513
of 20,902,589 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#4,418
of 6,770 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,229
of 266,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#72
of 117 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,902,589 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,770 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,995 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 117 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.