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Community-based dengue control intervention in Ouagadougou: intervention theory and implementation fidelity

Overview of attention for article published in Global Health Research and Policy, August 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Community-based dengue control intervention in Ouagadougou: intervention theory and implementation fidelity
Published in
Global Health Research and Policy, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s41256-018-0078-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Diane Saré, Dennis Pérez, Paul-André Somé, Yamba Kafando, Ahmed Barro, Valéry Ridde

Abstract

While malaria control is the primary health focus in Burkina Faso, the recent dengue epidemic calls for new interventions. This paper examines the implementation fidelity of an innovative intervention to control dengue in the capital Ouagadougou. First we describe the content of the intervention and its theory. We then assess the fidelity of the implementation. This step is essential as preparation for subsequent evaluation of the intervention's effectiveness. Observations (n = 62), analysis of documents related to the intervention (n = 8), and semi-structured interviews with stakeholders (n = 18) were conducted. The collected data were organized and analyzed using QDA Miner. The theory of the intervention, grounded in reported good practices of community-based interventions, was developed and discussed with key stakeholders. The theory of the intervention included four components: mobilization and organization, operational planning, community action, and monitoring/evaluation. The interactions among these components were intended to improve people's knowledge about dengue and enhance the community's capacity for vector control, which in turn would reduce the burden of the disease. The majority of the planned activities were conducted according to the intervention's original theory. Adaptations pertained to implementation and monitoring of activities. Despite certain difficulties, some of which were foreseeable and others not, this experience showed the feasibility of developing community-based interventions for vector-borne diseases in Africa.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 24%
Student > Master 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Other 3 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 24%
Social Sciences 3 9%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 9 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2019.
All research outputs
#3,146,776
of 13,804,624 outputs
Outputs from Global Health Research and Policy
#25
of 84 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,906
of 272,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Health Research and Policy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,804,624 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 84 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,464 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them