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The consensus molecular subtypes of colorectal cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Medicine, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Citations

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1095 Dimensions

Readers on

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1699 Mendeley
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4 CiteULike
Title
The consensus molecular subtypes of colorectal cancer
Published in
Nature Medicine, October 2015
DOI 10.1038/nm.3967
Pubmed ID
Authors

Justin Guinney, Rodrigo Dienstmann, Xin Wang, Aurélien de Reyniès, Andreas Schlicker, Charlotte Soneson, Laetitia Marisa, Paul Roepman, Gift Nyamundanda, Paolo Angelino, Brian M Bot, Jeffrey S Morris, Iris M Simon, Sarah Gerster, Evelyn Fessler, Felipe De Sousa E Melo, Edoardo Missiaglia, Hena Ramay, David Barras, Krisztian Homicsko, Dipen Maru, Ganiraju C Manyam, Bradley Broom, Valerie Boige, Beatriz Perez-Villamil, Ted Laderas, Ramon Salazar, Joe W Gray, Douglas Hanahan, Josep Tabernero, Rene Bernards, Stephen H Friend, Pierre Laurent-Puig, Jan Paul Medema, Anguraj Sadanandam, Lodewyk Wessels, Mauro Delorenzi, Scott Kopetz, Louis Vermeulen, Sabine Tejpar

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequently lethal disease with heterogeneous outcomes and drug responses. To resolve inconsistencies among the reported gene expression-based CRC classifications and facilitate clinical translation, we formed an international consortium dedicated to large-scale data sharing and analytics across expert groups. We show marked interconnectivity between six independent classification systems coalescing into four consensus molecular subtypes (CMSs) with distinguishing features: CMS1 (microsatellite instability immune, 14%), hypermutated, microsatellite unstable and strong immune activation; CMS2 (canonical, 37%), epithelial, marked WNT and MYC signaling activation; CMS3 (metabolic, 13%), epithelial and evident metabolic dysregulation; and CMS4 (mesenchymal, 23%), prominent transforming growth factor-β activation, stromal invasion and angiogenesis. Samples with mixed features (13%) possibly represent a transition phenotype or intratumoral heterogeneity. We consider the CMS groups the most robust classification system currently available for CRC-with clear biological interpretability-and the basis for future clinical stratification and subtype-based targeted interventions.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,699 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 <1%
Germany 8 <1%
Spain 8 <1%
United Kingdom 6 <1%
France 5 <1%
Belgium 4 <1%
Italy 3 <1%
Austria 2 <1%
Denmark 2 <1%
Other 15 <1%
Unknown 1632 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 382 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 372 22%
Student > Master 194 11%
Unspecified 163 10%
Student > Bachelor 131 8%
Other 457 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 492 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 444 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 363 21%
Unspecified 224 13%
Computer Science 44 3%
Other 132 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 421. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2019.
All research outputs
#23,797
of 13,698,363 outputs
Outputs from Nature Medicine
#91
of 6,685 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#571
of 252,471 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Medicine
#2
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,698,363 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,685 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,471 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.