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Video-based on-ward supervision for final year medical students

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, September 2015
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2 Dimensions

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Video-based on-ward supervision for final year medical students
Published in
BMC Medical Education, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12909-015-0430-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

JB Groener, TJ Bugaj, R. Scarpone, A. Koechel, J. Stiepak, S. Branchereau, M. Krautter, W. Herzog, C. Nikendei

Abstract

Constructive feedback is an essential element of the educational process, helping trainees reach their maximum potential and increasing their skill level. Video-based feedback has been described as highly effective in various educational contexts. The present study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of video-based, on-ward supervision for final year students in a clinical context with real patients. Nine final year medical students (three male, six female; aged 25.1 ± 0.7 years) and eight patients (five male, three female; aged 59.3 ± 16.8 years) participated in the pilot study. Final year students performed routine medical procedures at bedside on internal medicine wards at the University of Heidelberg Medical Hospital. Students were filmed and were under supervision. After performing the procedures, an oral feedback loop was established including student, patient and supervisor feedback on communicative and procedural aspects of skills performed. Finally, students watched their video, focusing on specific teachable moments mentioned by the supervisor. Written evaluations and semi-structured interviews were conducted that focused on the benefits of video-based, on-ward supervision. Interviews were analysed qualitatively, using open coding to establish recurring themes and overarching categories to describe patients' and students' impressions. Descriptive, quantitative analysis was used for questionnaire data. Supervised, self-chosen skills included history taking (n = 6), physical examination (n = 1), IV cannulation (n = 1), and ECG recording (n = 1). The video-based, on-ward supervision was well accepted by patients and students. Supervisor feedback was rated as highly beneficial, with the video material providing an additional opportunity to focus on crucial aspects and to further validate the supervisor's feedback. Students felt the video material would be less beneficial without the supervisor's feedback. The setting was rated as realistic, with filming not influencing behaviour. Video-based, on-ward supervision may be a powerful tool for improving clinical medical education. However, it should be regarded as an additional tool in combination with supervisors' oral feedback. Acceptance was high in both students and patients. Further research should address possibilities of efficiently combining and routinely establishing these forms of feedback in medical education.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 41 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 20%
Student > Master 8 18%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 11 25%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 52%
Computer Science 4 9%
Social Sciences 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Psychology 2 5%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 5 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,936,718
of 6,245,029 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#724
of 1,057 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,085
of 194,065 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#53
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,245,029 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,057 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,065 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.