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A little healthy competition: using mixed methods to pilot a team-based digital game for boosting medical student engagement with anatomy and histology content

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
100 Mendeley
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Title
A little healthy competition: using mixed methods to pilot a team-based digital game for boosting medical student engagement with anatomy and histology content
Published in
BMC Medical Education, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12909-015-0455-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Janssen, Tim Shaw, Peter Goodyear, B. Price Kerfoot, Deborah Bryce

Abstract

Digital games have been demonstrated to be beneficial for a range of non-recreational purposes, with a particular focus on their value for education. There is a limited amount of research supporting their use for medical education, but their are several studies on their use in areas such as surgical training, and life-support re-training. However, a significant gap exists in demonstrating how they engage with learners and games can be used most effectively in medical education. This pilot study assessed the value of digital games for teaching anatomy, by evaluating participant engagement and their attitudes towards a team-based strategy game. A digital game platform was designed, and then populated with anatomy questions developed by subject matter experts. Second year medical students were recruited to play three matches of the game. At the end of each match participants were asked to complete a Likert rating of their experiences of the game across five domains. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to assess engagement with the platform and perceived value to learners. Sixteen participants volunteered to participate. Post-match ratings indicated that participants had a generally positive experience with the game, with 89 % of respondents agreeing the game was engaging, 93 % of respondents agreeing the game was challenging and 74 % indicating they would like to play the game again if given the opportunity. A total of fourteen participants agreed to be interviewed after playing three matches of the game. Interview responses supported the findings of the post-match ratings that the game was considered enjoyable and engaging. Participants noted they particularly enjoyed the competitive aspect of the game, particularly the opportunity to play against peers they consider their academic equals. In addition to finding the game engaging interview participants indicated they perceived the game impacted on their knowledge around anatomy. In particular, participants noted that the game provided them unique insight into their knowledge strengths and deficits. This study demonstrated that digital games can engage medical students in traditionally-challenging areas such as anatomy and offer learners unique insights into their knowledge strengths and deficits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 2%
Spain 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 96 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 21%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Researcher 12 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 12%
Other 6 6%
Other 22 22%
Unknown 14 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 34%
Psychology 8 8%
Social Sciences 8 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Other 20 20%
Unknown 20 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 July 2016.
All research outputs
#1,792,915
of 11,296,984 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#327
of 1,492 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,349
of 249,483 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#14
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,296,984 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,492 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,483 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.