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Factors Influencing Fine Sediment on Stream Beds in the Midwestern United States

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Quality, January 2018
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Title
Factors Influencing Fine Sediment on Stream Beds in the Midwestern United States
Published in
Journal of Environmental Quality, January 2018
DOI 10.2134/jeq2018.02.0060
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher Konrad, Allen Gellis

Abstract

Fine sediment (particles <2 mm in diameter) in stream beds has wide-ranging effects on hydraulics, geomorphology, and ecology and is a primary focus for stream quality management in many regions. We identify reach- and basin-scale factors associated with fine sediment in the beds of 83 stream reaches in the Midwestern United States using recursive partitioning of sand-bed and gravel-bed streams and a generalized linear model for the fraction of a stream bed covered by fine sediment. A water-surface gradient of 0.00075 is the best single determinant (80% correct classification) distinguishing sand-bed streams (lower gradient) from gravel-bed streams (higher gradient). In the higher gradient category, sand-bed streams generally had more variable monthly precipitation than gravel-bed streams. The fractional response model indicated that the proportion of a stream bed composed of fine sediment is related to high sediment supply and low transport capacity but also high gravel transport capacity. This result is consistent with both theory and observations that bed material can be transported indiscriminately with respect to particle size under high shear stress, which will drive the particle size distribution of bed material toward the distribution of supply. Management of fine sediment in Midwestern streams has been approached largely by focusing on sediment supply, which may be immutable in some places due to the landscape position or glacial history. Retention of coarse sediment is an alternative management approach to reduce the fraction of fine sediment in the beds of some Midwestern streams.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 2 33%
Researcher 2 33%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 4 67%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 17%
Engineering 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2018.
All research outputs
#8,639,279
of 13,777,184 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Quality
#1,505
of 1,972 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#161,628
of 269,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Quality
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,777,184 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,972 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them