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Analysis of 5’ gene regions reveals extraordinary conservation of novel non-coding sequences in a wide range of animals

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Analysis of 5’ gene regions reveals extraordinary conservation of novel non-coding sequences in a wide range of animals
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0499-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nathaniel J. Davies, Peter Krusche, Eran Tauber, Sascha Ott

Abstract

Phylogenetic footprinting is a comparative method based on the principle that functional sequence elements will acquire fewer mutations over time than non-functional sequences. Successful comparisons of distantly related species will thus yield highly important sequence elements likely to serve fundamental biological roles. RNA regulatory elements are less well understood than those in DNA. In this study we use the emerging model organism Nasonia vitripennis, a parasitic wasp, in a comparative analysis against 12 insect genomes to identify deeply conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) conserved in large groups of insects, with a focus on 5' UTRs and promoter sequences. We report the identification of 322 CNEs conserved across a broad range of insect orders. The identified regions are associated with regulatory and developmental genes, and contain short footprints revealing aspects of their likely function in translational regulation. The most ancient regions identified in our analysis were all found to overlap transcribed regions of genes, reflecting stronger conservation of translational regulatory elements than transcriptional elements. Further expanding sequence analyses to non-insect species we also report the discovery of, to our knowledge, the two oldest and most ubiquitous CNE's yet described in the animal kingdom (700 MYA). These ancient conserved non-coding elements are associated with the two ribosomal stalk genes, RPLP1 and RPLP2, and were very likely functional in some of the earliest animals. We report the identification of the most deeply conserved CNE's found to date, and several other deeply conserved elements which are without exception, part of 5' untranslated regions of transcripts, and occur in a number of key translational regulatory genes, highlighting translational regulation of translational regulators as a conserved feature of insect genomes.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 31%
Researcher 9 25%
Student > Master 4 11%
Professor 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 6 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Computer Science 2 6%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 80. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2018.
All research outputs
#184,453
of 12,701,041 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#51
of 2,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,338
of 276,016 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#10
of 228 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,701,041 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,406 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,016 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 228 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.