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Prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding: efficacy of different multiple oral dose schedules of vitamin K

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Pediatrics, January 1997
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 policy sources
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1 tweeter
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2 Google+ users
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1 video uploader

Citations

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114 Dimensions

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding: efficacy of different multiple oral dose schedules of vitamin K
Published in
European Journal of Pediatrics, January 1997
DOI 10.1007/s004310050570
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Cornelissen, R. von Kries, P. Loughnan, G. Schubiger

Abstract

There is consensus that late vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) should be prevented by vitamin K prophylaxis. One single dose of 1 mg vitamin K1 is effective if given i.m. or s.c., but not if given orally. Repeated oral doses might be as effective as the parenteral dose but the optimal dose regimen remains to be established. Different oral dose schedules are presently used in different countries. In Australia, Germany, The Netherlands and Switzerland active surveillance data on late VKDB were collected in a similar manner and failure rates compared. Identical case definitions were used. There were three basic strategies for oral and one for parenteral vitamin K prophylaxis for healthy newborns in the four countries: (1) daily supplementation of low dose vitamin K (25 micrograms) for breast-fed infants (The Netherlands); (2) 3 x 1 mg orally [Australia (January 1993-March 1994) and Germany (December 1992-December 1994)]; (3) 1 mg vitamin K i.m. (Australia since March 1994); and (4) 2 x 2 mg vitamin K (new mixed micellar preparation) (Switzerland). The respective failure rates per 100,000 live births (including cases given all recommended doses and those given incomplete prophylaxis) were for strategy: (1) 0.2 (0-1.3) in The Netherlands; (2) 2.3 (95% CI 1.6-3.4) in Germany and 2.5 (1.1-4.8) in Australia (oral prophylaxis); (3) Australia (i.m. prophylaxis) 0 (0-0.9); and (4) 3.6 (0.7-10.6) in Switzerland. The failure rates for complete prophylaxis only were: strategy (1) 0 (0-0.7) in The Netherlands; (2) 1.8 (1.1-2.8) in Germany and 1.5 (0.5-3.6) in Australia; (3) Australia (i.m.) 0 (0-0.9); and (4) 1.2 (0-6.5) in Switzerland. The Australian data confirm that three oral doses of 1 mg vitamin K are less effective than i.m. vitamin K prophylaxis. A daily low oral dose of 25 micrograms vitamin K1 following an initial oral dose of 1 mg after birth for exclusively breast-fed infants may be as effective as parenteral vitamin K prophylaxis. The effectiveness of the "mixed-micellar" preparation of vitamin K1 needs further study.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 4%
United States 2 4%
Unknown 42 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Postgraduate 6 13%
Other 6 13%
Other 12 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 57%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Unspecified 4 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 October 2015.
All research outputs
#1,664,114
of 13,560,065 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Pediatrics
#240
of 2,365 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,670
of 282,356 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Pediatrics
#2
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,560,065 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,365 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,356 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.