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Feasibility of a birth cohort study dedicated to assessing acute infections using symptom diaries and parental collection of biomaterials

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
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Title
Feasibility of a birth cohort study dedicated to assessing acute infections using symptom diaries and parental collection of biomaterials
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1189-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Beate Zoch, André Karch, Johannes Dreesman, Masyar Monazahian, Armin Baillot, Rafael T. Mikolajczyk

Abstract

A birth cohort dedicated to studying infections in early childhood may be assisted by parental recording of symptoms on a daily basis and a collection of biomaterials. We aimed at testing the feasibility of this approach for use in a long-term study focusing on infections in children in Germany. Parents of 1- to 3-year-old children (n = 75) were recruited in nursery schools. They were asked to complete a symptom diary on a daily basis and to take monthly and symptom-triggered nasal swabs and stool samples from their child over the study period of three months. Feasibility was measured by means of the return proportions of symptom diaries and bio samples; acceptance was assessed by a questionnaire delivered to participants at the end of the study. The majority of the participants filled in the symptom diary during the three months study for 75 or more days (77.3 %), and provided the monthly nasal swabs (62.7 %) and stool samples (65.3 %). The time needed for the tasks was acceptable for most participants (symptom diary: 92.3 %, nasal swabs: 98.5 %, stool samples: 100.0 %). In 64.3 % of the symptom-triggered nasal swabs, respiratory viruses were found compared to 55.5 % in throat swabs taken by health-care professionals within the "ARE surveillance Lower Saxony", a special project by the Governmental Institute of Public Health of Lower Saxony to investigate causal pathogens for acute respiratory infections in children. The parental assessment of symptoms and collection of biomaterials in a birth cohort dedicated to studying infections appears feasible in a middle class German population. The success of the study will depend on the ability to maintain these activities over a long time period.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 30%
Researcher 3 13%
Professor 1 4%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 9%
Psychology 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 October 2015.
All research outputs
#4,707,769
of 6,367,740 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,234
of 3,025 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,610
of 196,773 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#124
of 160 outputs
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