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Clinical outcomes and molecular typing of heterogenous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in patients in intensive care units

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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38 Mendeley
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Title
Clinical outcomes and molecular typing of heterogenous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in patients in intensive care units
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1215-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Han-Chung Hu, Kuo-Chin Kao, Li-Chung Chiu, Chih-Hao Chang, Chen-Yiu Hung, Li-Fu Li, Tsui-Ping Liu, Lee-Chung Lin, Ning-Hung Chen, Chung-Chi Huang, Cheng-Ta Yang, Jang-Jih Lu

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is one of most common pathogens in humans. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) accounts for 64 % of S. aureus bacteremia isolated in intensive care units (ICUs), and heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediates S. aureus (hVISA) is a phenotype of MRSA. However, studies focusing on the hVISA impact on critically ill patients are scarce. This was a retrospective study conducted in a tertiary medical center from January 2009 to December 2010. All adult patients in ICUs with MRSA bloodstream infection were eligible. A modified population analysis profile and area under the curve method was applied to all isolates to confirm hVISA phenotype. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and the accessory gene regulator (agr) typing were performed individually. Clinical outcomes including in-hospital mortality, length of stay in intensive care unit and hospital after MRSA bacteremia of the patients were also analyzed. A total of 48 patients were enrolled and 14 patients were confirmed to have the hVISA phenotype. The prevalence of hVISA was 29.2 %. There was no difference in the age, sex, comorbidity, Charlson's comorbidity score and previous vancomycin therapy between the hVISA and VSSA groups. The hVISA group had a significantly higher in-hospital mortality than the VSSA group (13/14 versus 22/34; p = 0.046). All of the 14 hVISA patients had an MIC = 2 mg/L by E-test and this represented a significant association between high MIC and the development of hVISA (p < 0.001). MLST analysis showed all the isolates in the hVISA group were ST239, while ST239 (14/34; 41.2 %) and ST5 (12/34; 35.3 %) were predominant in the VSSA group (p = 0.007). A comparison of the survivor and non-survivor group showed that the hVISA phenotype (OR 11.8; 95 % CI 1.1-126.99; p = 0.042) and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score (OR 1.39; 95 % CI 1.07-1.81; p = 0.014) were independent factors significantly associated with in-hospital mortality. Patients in ICUs with MRSA bacteremia may have a higher in-hospital mortality if they have the hVISA phenotype. SOFA score is also predictor of mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Professor 4 11%
Other 4 11%
Researcher 4 11%
Other 14 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 37%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 13%
Unspecified 5 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Other 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,410,590
of 7,679,268 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,440
of 3,450 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,565
of 241,283 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#63
of 161 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,679,268 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,450 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,283 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 161 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.