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What is required in terms of mass drug administration to interrupt the transmission of schistosome parasites in regions of endemic infection?

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, October 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
What is required in terms of mass drug administration to interrupt the transmission of schistosome parasites in regions of endemic infection?
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1157-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

RM Anderson, HC Turner, SH Farrell, Jie Yang, JE Truscott

Abstract

Schistosomiasis is endemic in 54 countries, but has one of the lowest coverages by mass drug administration of all helminth diseases. However, with increasing drug availability through donation, the World Health Organisation has set a goal of increasing coverage to 75 % of at-risk children in endemic countries and elimination in some regions. In this paper, we assess the impact on schistosomiasis of the WHO goals in terms of control and elimination. We use an age-structured deterministic model of schistosome transmission in a human community and the effect of mass drug administration. The model is fitted to baseline data from a longitudinal re-infection study in Kenya and validated against the subsequent re-infection data. We examine the impact on host worm burden of the current treatment trend, extrapolated to meet the WHO goals, and its sensitivity to uncertainty in important parameters. We assess the feasibility of achieving elimination. Model results show that the current treatment trend, extrapolated to the WHO goals, is able to greatly reduce host worm burdens. If coverage is continued at the same level beyond 2020, elimination is possible for low to moderate transmission settings, where transmission intensity is defined by the basic reproduction number, R0. Low levels of adult coverage have a significant impact on worm burden in all settings. Model validation against the re-infection survey demonstrates that the age-structured model is able to match post-treatment data well in terms of egg output, but that some details of re-infection among school children and young adults are not currently well represented. Our work suggests that the current WHO treatment goals should be successful in bringing about a major reduction in schistosome infection in treated communities. If continued over a 15 year period, they are likely to result in elimination, at least in areas with lower transmission.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 66 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 19%
Researcher 13 19%
Student > Master 11 16%
Unspecified 8 12%
Student > Postgraduate 6 9%
Other 16 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 30%
Unspecified 14 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Other 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2015.
All research outputs
#7,454,228
of 13,237,907 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,495
of 3,510 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,704
of 281,361 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#157
of 417 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,237,907 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,510 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,361 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 417 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.