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Urinary Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) and proteinuria predict severity of acute kidney injury in Puumala virus infection

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
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Title
Urinary Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) and proteinuria predict severity of acute kidney injury in Puumala virus infection
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1180-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hanno Bunz, Peter Weyrich, Andreas Peter, Dorothea Baumann, Otto Tschritter, Martina Guthoff, Robert Beck, Gerhard Jahn, Ferruh Artunc, Hans-Ulrich Häring, Nils Heyne, Robert Wagner

Abstract

Nephropathia epidemica (NE) is a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) that is caused by the Puumala virus. Periodic outbreaks have been described in endemic areas, with a substantial number of previously healthy individuals developing acute kidney injury (AKI). There is a considerable diversity in the clinical course of the disease, and few patients require renal replacement therapy. We tested whether urinary neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (uNGAL), urine albumin/creatinine ratio (uACR), urine protein/creatinine ratio (uPCR), urine dipstick protein, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, leukocyte and platelet count, determined on admission to the hospital, can predict the severity of AKI. Sixty-one patients were analyzed during admission in the emergency department. The variables most strongly associated with peak plasma creatinine concentration were uNGAL (β = 0.70, p <0.0001), uPCR (β = 0.64, p = 0.001), uACR (β = 0.61, p = 0.002), and dipstick proteinuria (β = 0.34, p = 0.008). The highest AUC-ROC to predict stage 3 AKI according to the acute kidney injury network's (AKIN) classification was seen for uNGAL (0.81, p = 0.001). uNGAL accurately predicts the severity of AKI in NE. This could help emergency room physicians predict disease severity and allow for initial risk stratification.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 16%
Researcher 4 16%
Other 3 12%
Unspecified 2 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 8 32%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 56%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Unspecified 2 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 March 2019.
All research outputs
#10,997,589
of 14,473,946 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,372
of 5,380 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#180,749
of 285,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#378
of 584 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,473,946 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,380 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,359 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 584 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.