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Exploring the role of auxin in the androgynophore movement in Passiflora.

Overview of attention for article published in Genetics and Molecular Biology, July 2015
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Title
Exploring the role of auxin in the androgynophore movement in Passiflora.
Published in
Genetics and Molecular Biology, July 2015
DOI 10.1590/s1415-475738320140377
Pubmed ID
Authors

Scorza, Livia C T, Dornelas, Marcelo Carnier

Abstract

The flowers of the species belonging to the genus Passiflorashow a range of features that are thought to have arisen as adaptations to different pollinators. Some Passiflora species belonging to the subgenus Decaloba sect. Xerogona, show touch-sensitive motile androgynophores. We tested the role of auxin polar transport in the modulation of the androgynophore movement by applying auxin (IAA) or an inhibitor of auxin polar transport (NPA) in the flowers. We recorded the movement of the androgynophore during mechano-stimulation and analyzed the duration, speed, and the angle formed by the androgynophore before and after the movement, and found that both IAA and NPA increase the amplitude of the movement in P. sanguinolenta. We hypothesize that auxin might have a role in modulating the fitness of these Decaloba species to different pollination syndromes and demonstrate that an interspecific hybrid between insect- and hummingbird-pollinated Xerogona species present a heterosis effect on the speed of the androgynophore movement.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 3 27%
Student > Bachelor 2 18%
Student > Master 2 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Researcher 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 9%
Unknown 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2015.
All research outputs
#4,802,213
of 6,496,325 outputs
Outputs from Genetics and Molecular Biology
#140
of 210 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,608
of 208,494 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genetics and Molecular Biology
#8
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,496,325 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 210 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,494 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.