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For which cancers might patients benefit most from expedited symptomatic diagnosis? Construction of a ranking order by a modified Delphi technique

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
35 Mendeley
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Title
For which cancers might patients benefit most from expedited symptomatic diagnosis? Construction of a ranking order by a modified Delphi technique
Published in
BMC Cancer, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1865-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Willie Hamilton, Sally Stapley, Christine Campbell, Georgios Lyratzopoulos, Greg Rubin, Richard D. Neal

Abstract

This study aimed to answer the question 'for which cancers, in a symptomatic patient, does expediting the diagnosis provide an improvement in mortality and/or morbidity?' An initial ranking was constructed from previous work identifying 'avoidable deaths' for 21 common cancers in the UK. In a two-round modified Delphi exercise, 22 experts, all experienced across multiple cancers, used an evidence pack summarising recent relevant publications and their own experience to adjust this ranking. Participants also answered on a Likert scale whether they anticipated mortality or morbidity benefits for each cancer from expedited diagnosis. Substantial changes in ranking occurred in the Delphi exercise. Finally, expedited diagnosis was judged to provide the greatest mortality benefit in breast cancer, uterine cancer and melanoma, and least in brain and pancreatic cancers. Three cancers, prostate, brain and pancreas, attracted a median answer of 'disagree' to whether they expected mortality benefits from expedited diagnosis of symptomatic cancer. Our results can guide future research, with emphasis given to studying interventions to improve symptomatic diagnosis of those cancers ranked highly. In contrast, research efforts for cancers with the lowest rankings could be re-directed towards alternative avenues more likely to yield benefit, such as screening or treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 17%
Student > Master 4 11%
Unspecified 4 11%
Other 6 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 46%
Unspecified 9 26%
Computer Science 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 November 2015.
All research outputs
#1,010,923
of 9,770,846 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#215
of 4,084 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,593
of 248,667 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#12
of 278 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,770,846 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,084 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,667 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 278 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.