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Lyme Neuroborreliosis: Manifestations of a Rapidly Emerging Zoonosis

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Neuroradiology, April 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#38 of 3,475)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
18 tweeters
facebook
14 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
pinterest
2 Pinners

Citations

dimensions_citation
93 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
124 Mendeley
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Title
Lyme Neuroborreliosis: Manifestations of a Rapidly Emerging Zoonosis
Published in
American Journal of Neuroradiology, April 2009
DOI 10.3174/ajnr.a1579
Pubmed ID
Authors

P. Hildenbrand, D.E. Craven, R. Jones, P. Nemeskal

Abstract

Lyme disease has a worldwide distribution and is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. Incidence, clinical manifestations, and presentations vary by geography, season, and recreational habits. Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) is neurologic involvement secondary to systemic infection by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the United States and by Borrelia garinii or Borrelia afzelii species in Europe. Enhanced awareness of the clinical presentation of Lyme disease allows inclusion of LNB in the imaging differential diagnosis of facial neuritis, multiple enhancing cranial nerves, enhancing noncompressive radiculitis, and pediatric leptomeningitis with white matter hyperintensities on MR imaging. The MR imaging white matter appearance of successfully treated LNB and multiple sclerosis display sufficient similarity to suggest a common autoimmune pathogenesis for both. This review highlights differences in the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of Lyme disease in the United States, Europe, and Asia, with an emphasis on neurologic manifestations and neuroimaging.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 4%
Russia 2 2%
Japan 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 114 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 23%
Other 15 12%
Student > Postgraduate 13 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 9%
Other 43 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 75 60%
Unspecified 13 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 10%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 3%
Other 15 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2019.
All research outputs
#550,114
of 13,896,281 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#38
of 3,475 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,593
of 205,985 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#1
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,896,281 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,475 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,985 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.