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Chemoproteomic identification of molecular targets of antifungal prototypes, thiosemicarbazide and a camphene derivative of thiosemicarbazide, in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, August 2018
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1 tweeter

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Title
Chemoproteomic identification of molecular targets of antifungal prototypes, thiosemicarbazide and a camphene derivative of thiosemicarbazide, in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis
Published in
PLoS ONE, August 2018
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0201948
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joyce Villa Verde Bastos Borba, Sinji Borges Ferreira Tauhata, Cecília Maria Alves de Oliveira, Monique Ferreira Marques, Alexandre Melo Bailão, Célia Maria de Almeida Soares, Maristela Pereira

Abstract

Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a neglected human systemic disease caused by species of the genus Paracoccidioides. The disease attacks the host's lungs and may disseminate to many other organs. Treatment involves amphotericin B, sulfadiazine, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, or fluconazole. The treatment duration is usually long, from 6 months to 2 years, and many adverse effects may occur in relation to the treatment; co-morbidities and poor treatment adherence have been noted. Therefore, the discovery of more effective and less toxic drugs is needed. Thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and a camphene derivative of thiosemicarbazide (TSC-C) were able to inhibit P. brasiliensis growth at a low dosage and were not toxic to fibroblast cells. In order to investigate the mode of action of those compounds, we used a chemoproteomic approach to determine which fungal proteins were bound to each of these compounds. The compounds were able to inhibit the activities of the enzyme formamidase and interfered in P. brasiliensis dimorphism. In comparison with the transcriptomic and proteomic data previously obtained by our group, we determined that TSC and TSC-C were multitarget compounds that exerted effects on the electron-transport chain and cell cycle regulation, increased ROS formation, inhibited proteasomes and peptidases, modulated glycolysis, lipid, protein and carbohydrate metabolisms, and caused suppressed the mycelium to yeast transition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 63%
Student > Postgraduate 1 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 13%
Student > Master 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 63%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2018.
All research outputs
#11,170,509
of 12,555,036 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#116,808
of 137,362 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,439
of 270,891 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,375
of 1,641 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,555,036 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 137,362 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 1,641 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.