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Fat, weather, and date affect migratory songbirds’ departure decisions, routes, and time it takes to cross the Gulf of Mexico

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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12 X users
facebook
1 Facebook page
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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158 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
185 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Fat, weather, and date affect migratory songbirds’ departure decisions, routes, and time it takes to cross the Gulf of Mexico
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1503381112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jill L. Deppe, Michael P. Ward, Rachel T. Bolus, Robert H. Diehl, Antonio Celis-Murillo, Theodore J. Zenzal, Frank R. Moore, Thomas J. Benson, Jaclyn A. Smolinsky, Lynn N. Schofield, David A. Enstrom, Eben H. Paxton, Gil Bohrer, Tara A. Beveroth, Arlo Raim, Renee L. Obringer, David Delaney, William W. Cochran

Abstract

Approximately two thirds of migratory songbirds in eastern North America negotiate the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), where inclement weather coupled with no refueling or resting opportunities can be lethal. However, decisions made when navigating such features and their consequences remain largely unknown due to technological limitations of tracking small animals over large areas. We used automated radio telemetry to track three songbird species (Red-eyed Vireo, Swainson's Thrush, Wood Thrush) from coastal Alabama to the northern Yucatan Peninsula (YP) during fall migration. Detecting songbirds after crossing ∼1,000 km of open water allowed us to examine intrinsic (age, wing length, fat) and extrinsic (weather, date) variables shaping departure decisions, arrival at the YP, and crossing times. Large fat reserves and low humidity, indicative of beneficial synoptic weather patterns, favored southward departure across the Gulf. Individuals detected in the YP departed with large fat reserves and later in the fall with profitable winds, and flight durations (mean = 22.4 h) were positively related to wind profit. Age was not related to departure behavior, arrival, or travel time. However, vireos negotiated the GOM differently than thrushes, including different departure decisions, lower probability of detection in the YP, and longer crossing times. Defense of winter territories by thrushes but not vireos and species-specific foraging habits may explain the divergent migratory behaviors. Fat reserves appear extremely important to departure decisions and arrival in the YP. As habitat along the GOM is degraded, birds may be limited in their ability to acquire fat to cross the Gulf.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 185 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Japan 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Romania 1 <1%
Unknown 180 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 21%
Student > Master 37 20%
Researcher 29 16%
Student > Bachelor 21 11%
Other 9 5%
Other 20 11%
Unknown 30 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 99 54%
Environmental Science 33 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 1%
Unspecified 1 <1%
Other 7 4%
Unknown 40 22%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2021.
All research outputs
#2,248,205
of 25,026,088 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#26,561
of 102,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,847
of 291,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#440
of 908 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,026,088 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 102,225 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,392 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 908 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.