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DNA-methylation in C1R is a prognostic biomarker for acute myeloid leukemia

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

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27 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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22 Mendeley
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Title
DNA-methylation in C1R is a prognostic biomarker for acute myeloid leukemia
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13148-015-0153-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tanja Božić, Qiong Lin, Joana Frobel, Stefan Wilop, Melanie Hoffmann, Carsten Müller-Tidow, Tim H Brümmendorf, Edgar Jost, Wolfgang Wagner, Tim H. Brümmendorf

Abstract

Epigenetic aberrations play a central role in the pathophysiology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It has been shown that molecular signatures based on DNA-methylation (DNAm) patterns can be used for classification of the disease. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that DNAm at a single CpG site might support risk stratification in AML. Using DNAm profiles of 194 patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identified a CpG site in complement component 1 subcomponent R (C1R) as best suited biomarker: patients with higher methylation at this CpG site (>27 % DNAm) reveal significantly longer overall survival (53 versus 11 months; P < 0.0001). This finding was validated in an independent set of 62 DNAm profiles of cytogenetically normal AML patients (P = 0.009) and with a region-specific pyrosequencing assay in 84 AML samples (P = 0.012). DNAm of C1R correlated with genomic DNAm and gene expression patterns, whereas there was only moderate association with gene expression levels of C1R. These results indicate that DNAm of C1R is a biomarker reflecting chromatin reorganization rather than being of pathophysiological relevance per se. Notably, DNAm of C1R was associated with occurrence of specific genomic mutations that are traditionally used for risk stratification in AML. Furthermore, DNAm of C1R correlates also with overall survival in several other types of cancer, but the prognostic relevance was less pronounced than in AML. Analysis of DNAm at C1R provides a simple, robust, and cost-effective biomarker to further complement risk assessment in AML.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 5%
Germany 1 5%
Unknown 20 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 32%
Student > Master 5 23%
Researcher 4 18%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 23%
Computer Science 2 9%
Decision Sciences 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2018.
All research outputs
#1,494,623
of 15,754,679 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#83
of 835 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,543
of 287,125 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#18
of 104 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,754,679 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 835 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,125 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 104 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.