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What is the role of individual accountability in patient safety? A multi-site ethnographic study

Overview of attention for article published in Sociology of Health & Illness, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 1,411)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
117 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
What is the role of individual accountability in patient safety? A multi-site ethnographic study
Published in
Sociology of Health & Illness, November 2015
DOI 10.1111/1467-9566.12370
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emma-Louise Aveling, Michael Parker, Mary Dixon-Woods

Abstract

An enduring debate concerns how responsibility for patient safety should be distributed between organisational systems and individual professionals. Though rule-based, calculus-like approaches intended to support a 'just culture' have become popular, they perpetuate an asocial and atomised account. In this article, we use insights from practice theory - which sees organisational phenomena as accomplished in everyday actions, with individual agency and structural conditions as a mutually constitutive, dynamic duality - along with contributions from the political science and ethics literature as a starting point for analysis. Presenting ethnographic data from five hospitals, three in one high-income country and two in low-income countries, we offer an empirically informed, normative rethinking of the role of personal accountability, identifying the collective nature of the healthcare enterprise and the extent to which patient safety depends on contributions from many hands. We show that moral responsibility for actions and behaviours is an irreducible element of professional practice, but that individuals are not somehow 'outside' and separate from 'systems': they create, modify and are subject to the social forces that are an inescapable feature of any organisational system; each element acts on the other. Our work illustrates starkly the structuring effects of the broader institutional and socioeconomic context on opportunities to 'be good'. These findings imply that one of the key responsibilities of organisations and wider institutions in relation to patient safety is the fostering of the conditions of moral community.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 117 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 103 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 16%
Researcher 15 14%
Student > Master 15 14%
Unspecified 14 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 10%
Other 34 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 27%
Social Sciences 19 18%
Unspecified 16 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 12%
Psychology 12 11%
Other 17 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 85. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2019.
All research outputs
#203,510
of 13,845,249 outputs
Outputs from Sociology of Health & Illness
#11
of 1,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,296
of 284,056 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sociology of Health & Illness
#2
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,845,249 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,411 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,056 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.