↓ Skip to main content

Laparoscopic fundoplication surgery versus medical management for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in adults

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, November 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
172 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Laparoscopic fundoplication surgery versus medical management for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in adults
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, November 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd003243.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sushil K Garg, Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy

Abstract

Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a common condition with 3% to 33% of people from different parts of the world suffering from GORD. There is considerable uncertainty about whether people with GORD should receive an operation or medical treatment for controlling the condition. To assess the benefits and harms of laparoscopic fundoplication versus medical treatment for people with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. We searched the Cochrane Upper Gastrointestinal and Pancreatic Diseases Group (UGPD) Trials Register (June 2015), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 6, 2015), Ovid MEDLINE (1966 to June 2015), and EMBASE (1980 to June 2015) to identify randomised controlled trials. We also searched the references of included trials to identify further trials. We considered only randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing laparoscopic fundoplication with medical treatment in people with GORD irrespective of language, blinding, or publication status for inclusion in the review. Two review authors independently identified trials and independently extracted data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using both fixed-effect and random-effects models with RevMan 5 based on available case analysis. Four studies met the inclusion criteria for the review, and provided information on one or more outcomes for the review. A total of 1160 participants in the four RCTs were either randomly assigned to laparoscopic fundoplication (589 participants) or medical treatment with proton pump inhibitors (571 participants). All the trials included participants who had had reflux symptoms for at least six months and had received long-term acid suppressive therapy. All the trials included only participants who could undergo surgery if randomised to the surgery arm. All of the trials were at high risk of bias. The overall quality of evidence was low or very low. None of the trials reported long-term health-related quality of life (HRQoL) or GORD-specific quality of life (QoL).The difference between laparoscopic fundoplication and medical treatment was imprecise for overall short-term HRQOL (SMD 0.14, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.30; participants = 605; studies = 3), medium-term HRQOL (SMD 0.03, 95% CI -0.19 to 0.24; participants = 323; studies = 2), medium-term GORD-specific QoL (SMD 0.28, 95% CI -0.27 to 0.84; participants = 994; studies = 3), proportion of people with adverse events (surgery: 7/43 (adjusted proportion = 14.0%); medical: 0/40 (0.0%); RR 13.98, 95% CI 0.82 to 237.07; participants = 83; studies = 1), long-term dysphagia (surgery: 27/118 (adjusted proportion = 22.9%); medical: 28/110 (25.5%); RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.42; participants = 228; studies = 1), and long-term reflux symptoms (surgery: 29/118 (adjusted proportion = 24.6%); medical: 41/115 (35.7%); RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.46 to 1.03; participants = 233; studies = 1).The short-term GORD-specific QoL was better in the laparoscopic fundoplication group than in the medical treatment group (SMD 0.58, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.70; participants = 1160; studies = 4).The proportion of people with serious adverse events (surgery: 60/331 (adjusted proportion = 18.1%); medical: 38/306 (12.4%); RR 1.46, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.11; participants = 637; studies = 2), short-term dysphagia (surgery: 44/331 (adjusted proportion = 12.9%); medical: 11/306 (3.6%); RR 3.58, 95% CI 1.91 to 6.71; participants = 637; studies = 2), and medium-term dysphagia (surgery: 29/288 (adjusted proportion = 10.2%); medical: 5/266 (1.9%); RR 5.36, 95% CI 2.1 to 13.64; participants = 554; studies = 1) was higher in the laparoscopic fundoplication group than in the medical treatment group.The proportion of people with heartburn at short term (surgery: 29/288 (adjusted proportion = 10.0%); medical: 59/266 (22.2%); RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.69; participants = 554; studies = 1), medium term (surgery: 12/288 (adjusted proportion = 4.2%); medical: 59/266 (22.2%); RR 0.19, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.34; participants = 554; studies = 1), long term (surgery: 46/111 (adjusted proportion = 41.2%); medical: 78/106 (73.6%); RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.72); participants = 217; studies = 1) and those with reflux symptoms at short-term (surgery: 6/288 (adjusted proportion = 2.0%); medical: 53/266 (19.9%); RR 0.10, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.24; participants = 554; studies = 1) and medium term (surgery: 6/288 (adjusted proportion = 2.1%); medical: 37/266 (13.9%); RR 0.15, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.35; participants = 554; studies = 1) was less in the laparoscopic fundoplication group than in the medical treatment group. There is considerable uncertainty in the balance of benefits versus harms of laparoscopic fundoplication compared to long-term medical treatment with proton pump inhibitors. Further RCTs of laparoscopic fundoplication versus medical management in patients with GORD should be conducted with outcome-assessor blinding and should include all participants in the analysis. Such trials should include long-term patient-orientated outcomes such as treatment-related adverse events (including severity), quality of life, and also report on the social and economic impact of the adverse events and symptoms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 172 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Unknown 169 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 16%
Researcher 25 15%
Student > Bachelor 23 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 9%
Other 15 9%
Other 39 23%
Unknown 27 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 82 48%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 9%
Psychology 7 4%
Social Sciences 6 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 2%
Other 20 12%
Unknown 37 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 June 2017.
All research outputs
#2,309,165
of 13,454,310 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#5,046
of 10,598 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,118
of 284,815 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#167
of 251 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,454,310 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,598 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,815 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 251 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.