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In vivo evolution of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in patients during long-term treatment

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, August 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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38 Mendeley
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Title
In vivo evolution of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in patients during long-term treatment
Published in
BMC Genomics, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-018-5010-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuhui Xu, Fei Liu, Suting Chen, Jiannan Wu, Yongfei Hu, Baoli Zhu, Zhaogang Sun

Abstract

In the current scenario, the drug-resistant tuberculosis is a significant challenge in the control of tuberculosis worldwide. In order to investigate the in vivo evolution of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis, the present study envisaged sequencing of the draft genomes of 18 serial isolates from four pre-extensively drug-resistant (pre-XDR) tuberculosis patients for continuous genetic alterations. All of the isolates harbored single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ranging from 1303 to 1309 with M. tuberculosis H37Rv as the reference. SNPs ranged from 0 to 12 within patients. The evolution rates were higher than the reported SNPs of 0.5 in the four patients. All the isolates exhibited mutations at sites of known drug targets, while some contained mutations in uncertain drug targets including folC, proZ, and pyrG. The compensatory substitutions for rescuing these deleterious mutations during evolution were only found in RpoC I491T in one patient. Many loci with microheterogeneity showed transient mutations in different isolates. Ninety three SNPs exhibited significant association with refractory pre-XDR TB isolates. Our results showed evolutionary changes in the serial genetic characteristics of the pre-XDR TB patients due to accumulation of the fixed drug-resistant related mutations, and the transient mutations under continuous antibiotics pressure over several years.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 21%
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 11 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 8%
Computer Science 2 5%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 14 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2018.
All research outputs
#9,342,045
of 15,915,110 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,612
of 8,857 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,930
of 277,383 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#5
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,915,110 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,857 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,383 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.