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Takotsubo cardiomyopathy caused by epinephrine-treated bee sting anaphylaxis: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, October 2015
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  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Takotsubo cardiomyopathy caused by epinephrine-treated bee sting anaphylaxis: a case report
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13256-015-0722-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Diab Ghanim, Zvi Adler, Dahud Qarawani, Fabio Kusniec, Offer Amir, Shemy Carasso

Abstract

Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo) after bee stings in patients who have received catecholamines is rare. Endogenous as well as exogenous administration of catecholamines is thought to trigger stress-induced cardiomyopathy. A 37-year-old healthy white woman was stung by an unknown Hymenoptera that resulted in an anaphylactic reaction. Intravenous adrenaline (0.9 mg) was administered at a nearby clinic; she was transferred to our emergency room. Cardiogenic shock was diagnosed and mechanical ventilation commenced. Hemodynamic stabilization was not achieved by inotropic support and intra-aortic balloon pump insertion. Initial coronary angiography did not demonstrate any coronary obstructive lesions while her left ventricular systolic function was severely depressed. Peripheral femoral venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was inserted as a bridge to recovery assuming possible reversible cause of the cardiogenic shock. Over the following 48 hours she was extubated and gradually weaned off venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and inotropic support. She was discharged with a near normal left ventricular ejection fraction and in 3 weeks she was asymptomatic with normal electrocardiographic and echocardiographic examinations (left ventricular ejection fraction >65 %). A Hymenoptera sting may be a specific cause of catecholamine cardiac depression. The presence of cardiogenic shock and its etiology should prompt aggressive management including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to cardiac functional recovery in such rare scenarios.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Master 4 8%
Other 11 22%
Unknown 15 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 36%
Psychology 5 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 16 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,850,400
of 13,055,200 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#321
of 2,199 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,910
of 282,108 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#26
of 164 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,055,200 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,199 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,108 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 164 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.