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Variations in GP–patient communication by ethnicity, age, and gender: evidence from a national primary care patient survey

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
Title
Variations in GP–patient communication by ethnicity, age, and gender: evidence from a national primary care patient survey
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, November 2015
DOI 10.3399/bjgp15x687637
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jenni Burt, Cathy Lloyd, John Campbell, Martin Roland, Gary Abel

Abstract

Doctor-patient communication is a key driver of overall satisfaction with primary care. Patients from minority ethnic backgrounds consistently report more negative experiences of doctor-patient communication. However, it is currently unknown whether these ethnic differences are concentrated in one gender or in particular age groups. To determine how reported GP-patient communication varies between patients from different ethnic groups, stratified by age and gender. Analysis of data from the English GP Patient Survey from 2012-2013 and 2013-2014, including 1 599 801 responders. A composite score was created for doctor-patient communication from five survey items concerned with interpersonal aspects of care. Mixed-effect linear regression models were used to estimate age- and gender-specific differences between white British patients and patients of the same age and gender from each other ethnic group. There was strong evidence (P<0.001 for age by gender by ethnicity three-way interaction term) that the effect of ethnicity on reported GP-patient communication varied by both age and gender. The difference in scores between white British and other responders on doctor-patient communication items was largest for older, female Pakistani and Bangladeshi responders, and for younger responders who described their ethnicity as 'Any other white'. The identification of groups with particularly marked differences in experience of GP-patient communication - older, female, Asian patients and younger 'Any other white' patients - underlines the need for a renewed focus on quality of care for these groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 28%
Unspecified 9 23%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Other 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 35%
Unspecified 11 28%
Psychology 5 13%
Social Sciences 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,565,383
of 13,458,925 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#762
of 2,903 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,327
of 283,451 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#15
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,458,925 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,903 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,451 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.