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Personality Is Reflected in the Brain's Intrinsic Functional Architecture

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, November 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
40 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
191 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
441 Mendeley
citeulike
6 CiteULike
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Title
Personality Is Reflected in the Brain's Intrinsic Functional Architecture
Published in
PLoS ONE, November 2011
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0027633
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan S. Adelstein, Zarrar Shehzad, Maarten Mennes, Colin G. DeYoung, Xi-Nian Zuo, Clare Kelly, Daniel S. Margulies, Aaron Bloomfield, Jeremy R. Gray, F. Xavier Castellanos, Michael P. Milham

Abstract

Personality describes persistent human behavioral responses to broad classes of environmental stimuli. Investigating how personality traits are reflected in the brain's functional architecture is challenging, in part due to the difficulty of designing appropriate task probes. Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) can detect intrinsic activation patterns without relying on any specific task. Here we use RSFC to investigate the neural correlates of the five-factor personality domains. Based on seed regions placed within two cognitive and affective 'hubs' in the brain--the anterior cingulate and precuneus--each domain of personality predicted RSFC with a unique pattern of brain regions. These patterns corresponded with functional subdivisions responsible for cognitive and affective processing such as motivation, empathy and future-oriented thinking. Neuroticism and Extraversion, the two most widely studied of the five constructs, predicted connectivity between seed regions and the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and lateral paralimbic regions, respectively. These areas are associated with emotional regulation, self-evaluation and reward, consistent with the trait qualities. Personality traits were mostly associated with functional connections that were inconsistently present across participants. This suggests that although a fundamental, core functional architecture is preserved across individuals, variable connections outside of that core encompass the inter-individual differences in personality that motivate diverse responses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 40 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 441 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 9 2%
Germany 6 1%
France 4 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Poland 2 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Other 11 2%
Unknown 402 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 102 23%
Researcher 80 18%
Student > Master 58 13%
Student > Bachelor 48 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 26 6%
Other 86 20%
Unknown 41 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 173 39%
Neuroscience 52 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 47 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 10%
Social Sciences 13 3%
Other 46 10%
Unknown 67 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 June 2016.
All research outputs
#511,361
of 15,545,638 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#8,413
of 155,413 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,455
of 214,801 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#152
of 3,700 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,545,638 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 155,413 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 214,801 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,700 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.